MacBook-Air-600

Apple was just awarded 19 patents, one of which is for the design of the MacBook Air.

In theory, Apple could leverage its patent on the Air to try and block manufacturers of other light, thin laptops from marketing their products in the U.S.

The patent, No. D654,072, refers to an “ornamental design for an electronic device,” and lists Steve Jobs as one of its inventors. While the term “MacBook Air” isn’t cited, the drawings of a laptop with tapered design is unmistakable.

Just before the patent was awarded on Valentine’s Day, a report on 9to5 Mac alleged that Apple had approached one of its Taiwanese suppliers, Pegatron, about ceasing production of another laptop with an eerily similar design, the Asustek Zenbook.

Pegatron, which recently began manufacturing iPhones for Apple, will reportedly cease Zenbook production in March, forcing Asus to look elsewhere.

Although the action, if true, occurred prior to the date when the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office awarded Apple its patent on the MacBook Air, it shows that Apple won’t hesitate to move against any competitor it sees as copying its ideas. The patent could embolden Apple to go after other makers of Ultrabooks, the Windows PC world’s answer to the MacBook Air, a project that Intel spearheaded.

SEE ALSO: How Intel Plans to Make Ultrabooks a Lot Cheaper [VIDEO]

There are several Ultrabooks on the market now, with dozens more on the way. If Apple decides to go after Air clones the way it’s waged its legal war against Android manufacturers, the consumer PC industry could be in trouble. Many companies — with Intel in the lead — have a lot riding on Ultrabooks, and the prospect of fighting Apple in court would make any CEO nervous.

However, there’s a simple way around the patent: Just design something different. Ultrabooks like the HP Spectre and Lenovo Yoga look nothing like the MacBook Air and should be in the clear.

However, Dell and Samsung — Apple’s favorite legal targets — might want to start preparing counterarguments.


BONUS: The Best, Worst and Craziest Ultrabooks From CES 2012

Acer Aspire S5

The skinny:
Claiming to be the “world’s thinnest” Ultrabook, the Acer Aspire S5 measures just 0.68 inches at its thickest point and weighs just 3 pounds. It has a 13.3-inch screen.

Interesting feature:
Besides its überthinness, the S5 also boasts next-generation connectivity with a Thunderbolt port, with provides a high-speed connection to peripherals. Acer’s Always Connect tech keeps the machine logged into services when it goes to sleep, and you can wake it up via smartphone.

Potential roadblock:
The price, which is currently unknown.

Bottom line:
The Aspire S5’s thickness certainly comes in well under Intel’s guidelines. If it can perform the same trick with the price, Acer will have scored a home run.

Click here to view this gallery.

[via Patently Apple]

More About: apple, laptops, macbook air, patents, trending, Ultrabooks

For more Dev & Design coverage:



It could be the most direct evidence so far that Apple is developing a television set: the company filed for a patent on a new kind of touchscreen remote control last September, according to a report.

The patent, made public Thursday and first reported by Apple Insider, would create a simpler remote in two ways. First, it would only show controls that are relevant or used frequently, hiding the others. Second, it would automatically detect and configure itself to control the devices in a user’s home.

The patent makes a lot of sense in the context of the recent discussion of a real Apple TV. After Walter Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs revealed that Apple was developing a TV set, many suspected the user interface might use Siri, the voice assistant found in the iPhone 4S. Then came rumors of screen sizes and gesture controls.

The entire remote concept sounds very Apple, and the patent application’s accusation that many buttons on today’s remote controls are “clutter” and “can cause confusion to the user when trying to locate a seldom-used feature” certainly rings true.

However, one of the aspects of button-based remote controls that many users appreciate is their feel. On a remote with hard buttons, it’s very easy to locate the right button without even looking at the remote, just by touch. A remote control that’s all touchscreen would mean the user would have to look down to operate it, taking attention away from the screen.

Nonetheless, manufacturers have brought remote controls with touchscreens to market before — for example, the Logitech Harmony 1000 — though those are usually supplemented with several hard buttons, and not many were successes.

Is this what you’d want an Apple TV remote control to be? How would you improve it? Let us know in the comments.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, mishooo

More About: apple, Apple TV, itv, patents, remote controls

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Steve Jobs Exhibit

The late Steve Jobs has been hailed as a brilliant businessman, marketer, and visionary. He was also an prolific inventor, if the number of patents bearing his name are any indication.

No less than 323 Apple patents list Jobs among the inventors responsible for them. Now the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is honoring the Apple founder with a dedicated exhibit.

The Patents and Trademarks of Steve Jobs: Art and Technology that Changed the World puts Jobs’ patents on display in the USPTO’s National Inventors Hall of Fame and Museum. Conceived by the nonprofit Invent Now, the exhibit has a look that’s instantly recognizable: 30 giant-size iPhones, lined up screen to screen in a simple rectangular formation, like a military salute designed by Jonathan Ive.

Among the patents Jobs is credited with: “Method and apparatus for use of rotational user inputs,” which essentially patented the iPod clickwheel; “Voicemail manager for portable multifunction device,” the basis for the iPhone’s visual voicemail; and 13 separate patents on product packaging alone.

While the exhibit is meant to “give insight into the visionary commitment” of Jobs, the patent vault at Apple has factored highly in the escalation of legal battles over intellectual property in recent years. Most prominently, Samsung has been engaged in patent wars with Apple over how closely its Galaxy products mimic the design and operation of iPhones and iPads, as shown in this infographic.

To a lesser extent, Nokia, Motorola, and even LG have tussled with Apple over patent infringement.

The Jobs exhibit kicked off Nov. 16 and is on display until Jan. 15, 2012. Located in the atrium of the Madison Building on the USPTO’s campus in Alexandria, Va., it’s free to attend during the museum’s regular business hours.

Steve Jobs Patents

More About: apple, ipad, iphone, patents, steve jobs

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Nitin Gupta is the co-founder of LawPivot.com, an online marketplace for businesses to receive crowdsourced legal advice from lawyers. You can follow LawPivot on Twitter @LawPivot. This post was co-authored by Eric Hutchins, a patent attorney at Kilpatrick Townsend, & Stockton.

On Sept. 8, Congress passed a patent reform bill named the “Leahy-Smith America Invents Act.” President Obama signed the act into law on Sept. 16. The most relevant aspect of the act for startups is the switch from a “first-to-invent” to a “first-to-file” system.

The United States has long been the sole nation with a first-to-invent system, which ensures — in theory — that the first person to invent something receives the patent protection for that invention. The rest of the world has long employed a first-to-file system, in which patent rights are awarded to the first person to file an application for the invention, regardless of the date of invention. The America Invents Act will harmonize U.S. patent laws with international standards.

Here are three things startups should do, given the new patent reform.


1. Have the Rights to File Patent Applications on Behalf of Your Employees


Add language to employee agreements that give your company the right to file patent applications on behalf of the inventor. Prior to the Act, the Patent Office required a declaration from an inventor stating under oath that he or she was indeed the first person (to his or her knowledge) to conceive of the invention. While this declaration was of key importance to the first-to-invent system, the Act recognizes the realities of the modern workforce, where inventors migrate frequently between employers, and provides companies with the ability to submit a substitute statement. This statement functions in lieu of an executed inventor declaration. In it, the employer states that it has the legal authority to seek the patent without the inventor’s declaration because the inventor is deceased, legally incapacitated, unable to be found after a reasonable search, or refuses to assign his or her patent rights to the employer in violation of a valid contract to do so.

Startups should review existing employee agreements and revise them if necessary so that they can use these substitute statements to avoid delays when locating a former employee or when obtaining his or her consent proves difficult.


2. Encourage Your Employees to Quickly Report the Inventive Aspects of New Product Features


Emphasize to your teams the importance of quickly reporting inventive aspects of new product features. Rather than leave the process to chance, work with your patent lawyer to have a clear protocol in place to identify inventive features and to prepare a description of the invention that will allow business managers to decide whether a patent makes sense. This will enable the lawyer to quickly prepare the application.


3. Make Rapid Decisions on Whether or Not to File Patent Applications


Once a team member identifies an inventive feature, decisions on whether or not to file a patent application will need to be made quickly in a first-to-file system. More frequent communication with your patent lawyer is key. Rather than hold monthly or quarterly meetings with your patent lawyer to discuss new inventions and the status of pending applications, plan to notify your lawyer of new inventions earlier and more often to avoid being beaten to the patent office.


The first-to-file system will take effect 18 months from now. This gives you time to plan ahead, consult patent attorneys and adjust your processes to account for these changes.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, aluxum

More About: Business, features, legal, patents, Startups

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Patents are a source of constant lawsuits between large tech companies like Apple, Microsoft and Samsung. They’re one reason Google wants to pay $12.5 billion for Motorola Mobility. And many entrepreneurs believe these documents stunt innovation rather than protect it.

Last year, 107,792 patents were issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

Here are some interesting points on the history, process and recent impacts of this important component of the tech ecosystem.




Patent Wars

[via BusinessInsurance.org]

More About: patents, software patents

Hello and welcome to another edition of ‘7 Days of Search and Social‘. I hope this edition finds you well.

Lead Story 

More Guidance from Google

Right, yes, we did say that we weren’t talking about that damned Asian bear anymore, but seems an abundance of bamboo is still flowing about the web and the damned things just keep on propagating. To that end I give you;

More guidance on building high-quality sites

Interesting stuff in there for sure. Looks like ome quality rater questions, but it’s hard to be sure. Just for fun? Go through a Google SERP and see how well their doing by their own guidelines.

Also, I am not so sure about the “don’t worry about algos” mantra as I find having some insight where things might be headed, certainly helps one avoid issues that often arise for many of the Googly ‘updates’. Strategies that stand the test of time! (huh, that would make a good tagline…)

On with the rest of this week’s goodies.

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Talk of the Town 

Due to the lateness of me getting to this week’s offering, I shall forego the editorial insights on the TotT section. Rest assured all the posts are certainly worth reading. So jump right in!

Build Trust–Not Just Links – SEP

Google Panda Update – User Behavior and Other Signals – We Build Pages

SEO Posers! 9 Stark Signals Your SEO Tool Is Futile – Aim Clear

Proven Ways To Use Content To Attract Links – SEL

How To Bake SEO Into Viral-Friendly Blog Posts – Ross Hudgens

12-Step Program to Buy Back Time – SEP

Should Startups Invest Heavily in SEO? – SEP

SEO Lessons Learned Through Pictures of Matt Cutts – SEER

Characteristics of the Google Panda Algorithm – SEO Theory

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Search Geek Central

Search Geek Goodies

Social Search

Going Vertical

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Videos

What does an SEO copywriter do, anyway?

The Future of Search and Universal Search with Mike Grehan

Cutt’s Corner

Is there an advantage to using rel="canonical" over 301?

How do we report a problem with our search results?

Will Google improve its crawling of AJAX?

Weapons

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Search Patents

Google

Social Search Engine

Social Messaging User Interface

Methods and systems for identifying paraphrases from an index of information items and associated sentence fragments

Systems and methods for detecting click spam

Search over structured data

Entity display priority in a distributed geographic information system

Ranking video articles

Microsoft

Recommending queries when searching against keywords

Search Result Enhancement Through Image Duplicate Detection

Yahoo

Time-based analysis of related keyword searching

PAIRWISE Ranking based classifier


/end SOSG session

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Check out the SEO Tools guide at Search Engine Journal.

Weekly Search & Social News: 05/10/2011


Hello and welcome to another edition of ‘7 Days of Search and Social‘. Last week was a bit of an odd one as there were a few dramas that seemed to take up a LOT of attention (Overstock and algo update). None-the-less we still found a bunch of other good reading to go with it.

On with the news….

Lead Story

Latest Google Algorithm Changes

It was a dead heat for the top story this week between the algo changes and the Overstock affair. Ultimately, the algo changes are probably more important, so we’re going that direction.

For those living under rocks, late Thursday Google announced another major change. And unlike the ‘attribution update’ a few week’s back (affecting 2% of queries), this one was HUGE. Google is looking to further curtail thin content and attribution issues and it is affecting some 12% of queries.

Details;

This one has been pretty interesting that’s for sure, we’ve been getting a lot of reports of collateral damage. That’s fairly standard though because there’s always winners and losers with algo changes. Personally, I am still seeing a fair amount of thin content in the SERPs, which was supposed to be one of the goals here.

Let’s give it some time.

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Talk of the Town 

Overstock Gets Penalized by Google – This was the other big story last week and yours truly was right in the thick of things. Just like JC Penney and Forbes before it, the folks at Overstock got the Google smack down for some shoddy link building tactics. You can read my coverage (linked title) or get some more details via; Search Engine Roundtable, Blog Storm, Search Engine Land

New Google PageRank Algorithm Debunked – was a post which our new friend Val made some corrections to a previous article about the ‘reasonable surfer’ which we tore him a new hole for via SEOBS. Nice work Val, yer a good man!

How To Get The Most Search Engine Marketing Value From Key Content Initiatives – in interesting, if not a bit brief, by my standards, post from Eric Edmonds via SEL. One can never get enough good reading on content programs.

Click Distribution & Percentages by SERP Rank – while one does have to take this kind of data with a grain of salt, it is always interesting to get a sense of CTR rates for various query spaces.

Link Acquisition & Contextual Relevancy [Part 1] – what can I say? Once again Richard brings us some great geeking. Be sure to give it a read and add his blog to your RSS for the next parts in the series.

Dear Google…THAT was a content farm update? – LOL. I was also looking around a bunch of query spaces over the last few days and found myself wondering many of the same things that Michael did. Give it a read!

The SEO Industry needs to grow a pair – while I may not agree with all of Alan’s suppositions in this post, there are many that I do. There’s also some healthy discussions going on in the comments, as such, a worth addition to this edition.

Would you report a competitor to Google? – and last but not least, in light of the recent outings, I decided to write a post on SEJ that looks at the recent happenings and asks the question that needs to be asked. Please do go and leave your own thoughts in the comments.

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Search Geek Central

Search Geek Goodies

Social Search

Going Vertical

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Videos

Google Farmer Update, Overstock Penalized, Bing’s Facebook Likes & Mobile SEO

Video Search Optimization Tips from Will Critchlow of Distilled at SES London 2011

Cutt’s Corner

How does Google treat sites where all external are nofollowed?

Does Google still recommend 100 links or fewer per page?

 

Weapons

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Search Patents

Google

Local item extraction

Business listing search

Web page experiments with fragmented section variations

Yahoo

Extracting semantic relations from query logs

Search query categorization into verticals

Enabling searching of user ratings and reviews using user profile location, and social networks


/end SOSG session

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Check out the SEO Tools guide at Search Engine Journal.

Weekly Search & Social News: 03/01/2011


Hello and welcome back to ‘7 Days of Search and Social‘. It was another fun filled week out in the trenches last week. Some (big?) news from Google. More drama. But we avoid that for the most part right? I hope this week is going well and your kicking a$$ and taking SERPs!

On with the news….

Lead Story

Google Gets Social, again…

While there was a few interesting tidbits, including Forbes being the latest caught in the paid link crackdown, I decided this one was more important. For those that missed it, Google updated it’s social search to be included into the regular results, as opposed to being displayed at the bottom as it was in the past.

Here’s some reading;

Why is this a more important story than the paid links stuff? Simple, because this is an important evolution. I’ve been hard on real time and social search since it’s inception because it just wasn’t making sense. This change though has an important element; it can cause re-ranking of results.

This is a form of personalization beyond search and surfing history that we need to factor into our thinking. In truth, I didn’t see this one coming. This isn’t SideWiki. This isn’t SearchWiki. This isn’t Google Buzz. Those one’s are next to useless. This one has legs.

More soon….

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Talk of the Town 

Search Geeks Speak – last week on the SGS podcast we had a some great link builders on in the form of; Debra Mastaler, Garrett French and Wil Reynolds. Given the people on board, it goes without saying that it rocked!

Don’t Lie To Google In A Google Help Forum – was a classic Google forums thread brought to light via Search Engine Roundtable. Not only is it dumb to try and fool Google, but that company is just HILARIOUS. Nice find Barry!

The Content Marketing Process Explained – some interesting assessments and ideas on content programs via SEP.

Connections, Relations and Search: What Your Social Graph Says About You – since we’re on the topic of social graphs this week, I found a nice post over on Level 343. If you’re still trying to get your head around it, it’s worth a read.

How Dare You Tell Me To NoFollow My Sponsored Links – speaking of Barry, I was also happy to see this post defending his choice to sell advertising on Search Engine Roundtable. I do the same. Why? Because I am not selling PageRank, I am selling traffic, prominence etc.

JCPenney Responds to NYT and Google – while we’ve stayed away from the drama, for the most part, this response was at least interesting. Now we can lay this one to rest.

Study Asks, Can You Trust Google’s Personalized Search Results?– WOW. What a find. I really enjoyed this and while I haven’t looked into the moethodology yet, there’s some very interesting goodies in here.

The Next Generation of Ranking Signals – while we tend to give the Moz a hard time now and again, this post from Rand is fairly in-line with my own thoughts (over the years) on where we might be headed. A worthy addition.

Somewhere at MountainView – ok, we all need a good laugh now and again, right? Go. Read. Laugh.

Are Manual Solutions The Answer To Content Farms? – was my post on Search Engine Land last week. I was musing about what the real solution for thin content might be. I also talked to Blekko and others; give it a read.

Turn Stolen Copy Lemons Into Link Lemonade – Debra, via The Link Spiel, was dealing with scrapers and how you can not only identify them, but also how you might be able to turn the situation into your advantage.

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Search Geek Central

Search Geek Goodies

Social Search

Going Vertical

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Videos

Search Engine Roundtable Weekly Video Recap – SER

Google Social Search Update – Google

Cutt’s Corner

Is there any advice that you want to change from the past?

When are penalties lifted?

Will I be penalized for hidden content if I have text in a drop-down?

 

Weapons

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Search Patents

Google

Presenting comments from various sources

Methods and Systems for Endorsing Local Search Results

Sharing user distributed search results

Document based synonym generation

Presentation of search results with common subject matters

Translating a search query into multiple languages

Microsoft

Using categorical metadata to rank search results

Incremental query refinement

Recommending queries when searching against keywords

Yahoo

Query-URL N-Gram Features in Web Ranking

Adding identity to web rank


/end SOSG session

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Check out the SEO Tools guide at Search Engine Journal.

Weekly Search & Social News: 02/22/2011


Hello and welcome back to ‘7 Days of Search and Social‘. Another week, another drama. While I’ve not looked historically to past years, one does have to wonder if the winter blaaah creates more drama in the search industry? After so many months of peace, each week brings more excitement lately it seems.

For our part, we’ll side-step it as much as possible, ok?

Lead Story

JC Penney gets whacked

I actually had a different lead story, but that changed on Saturday. Most of you I am sure heard already, but for those that hadn’t, it seems the folks over at J.C. Penney were outed via the New york times for paid links.

The news;

It really did blow up over the weekend… poor sods. But for anyone working on big corp sites. On highly competitive query spaces. Paid links are a reality. If it is you doing it or the competition, there is no lack of crap-hat link building out there.

For me the more interesting question is; WTF is Google doing? Apparently they had dealt with J.C. Penney in the past on other infractions. You would have thought they’d gone through their link profile with a fine toothed comb no?

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Talk of the Town 

SEO is all about the situation – was an article I threw together last week to look at the not-to-often discussed area of SEO programming. And more specifically, the fact that we must bring fresh eyes to each situation. There is no cookie-cutter approach.

How Link Analysis Works for SEO – Michael had another entry into the ‘link anaysis’ discussion from the last while. This one was notable because he spends a fair amount of time on an area I don’t see enough of; on site link analysis.

Two Diametrically Opposed Google Editorial Philosophies – and of course the other never ending saga, thin content, is going strong. For the record, I still don’t see anything other than an algorithmic approach working.

Google Warns Of "Big Changes Here Very Shortly"– while I am hesitant to get worked up over a single mention, it is certainly notable given the buzz over the last while towards Google. What are ‘big changes’? No bloody idea… time will tell.

The Seven Forgotten Keyword Research Sources – not a massively innovative article, but it holds some solid tips for generating terms beyond the every-day. It’s worth a read and worth remembering the next time you’re doing some KW research.

Don’t believe Google Autocomplete when it comes to scams, – was an interesting article by Malcolm Coles that highlights some wonky suggestions and well… I just thought it was interesting. Worth a read.

Mahalo’s Calacanis: Time To End The Content Farm Arms Race – WOW. Seems that Jason is back in the (search) news and is actually taking the high road? He’s a spam fighter now? Huh… add this one to the ‘twilight zone’ section this week.

Keyword Research: Using Categories to Make Your Process More Actionable – some good geeking over on the Moz from Richard Baxter. What more do I need to say? Always worth a read… Go. Now. Read.

Excuse Me While I Have A Ranking Report Rant – while I generally don’t agree with more ranking report rants, this one surely does a balanced enough job of it for me to at least share. And yes, I do actually report on articles I don’t fully agree with. It’s only fair.

eHow and Mahalo: How Many Keyword Variations is Too Many? – Laugh, cry or shudder, either way a good article. There sure aren’t a lack of ‘content farm’ / ‘thin content’ articles of late; add this one to the collection.

Bing Results Get Localized & Personalized – YAY! It seems ol Bing is finally starting to move into the world of personalization. I’d long wondered why they hadn’t seen fit to go at it as hard as Googly. Oh right. They would have been accused of copying.. hehe.

Mea Culpa: How I Failed At Link Building – was an interesting post from Adam which looks at paid linking and related problems he’s had with them. More interesting is that we’ve seen a few of these from prominent publications of late. Is the paid links war coming to an end? Not likely…

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Search Geek Central

Search Geek Goodies

Social Search

Going Vertical

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Videos

Is the Web in Danger with Current Web Space Gone? – iEntry

Will I be penalized for hidden content if I have text in a "read more" dropdown? – feat Bruce Clay

Cutt’s Corner

Will I be penalized for hidden content if I have text in a "read more" dropdown?

Weapons

7 Free Keyword Tools for Thousands of Keyword Suggestions – SEO Begin

Linking Google Analytics to Webmaster Tools – Google Wembaster Central

Search safety settings in SEO PowerSuite: tweaking the parameters to get maximum performance. – Link Assistant

Site Update – Changes to “My Reports” – Majestic

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Search Patents

Google

Identification of web sites that contain session identifiers

Content retrieval from sites that use session identifiers

Microsoft

Cloaking detection utilizing popularity and market value

Yahoo

Discovering query intent from search queries and concept networks

Segment sensitive query matching of documents

System for personalized term expansion and recommendation

Automatic classification of segmented portions of web pages


/end SOSG session

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Check out the SEO Tools guide at Search Engine Journal.

Weekly Search & Social News: 02/15/2011


Hello and welcom back to ‘7 Days of Search and Social‘. Obviously the (big?) news last week was Google’s supposed ‘thin content’ algorithm changes. But fear not, we won’t hang on that too long because there was a ton of great stuff across the board. It’s some heavy lifting this week folks, so start warming up.

And away…..

Lead Story

Google acts on content attribution

On Friday it seems that Google made an announcement about some algorithm changes they recently made (beginning of last week apparently). Is that news? Well, it shouldn’t be since they make for 3-400 per year, but it is.

As the story goes, it seems what they’re doing is tightening up how they deal with attribution and duplicate content on the web (specifically aimed at scrapers?). This is something I was actually writing about last summer with; How Content Syndication Can Backfire

Now, there are those that seem to think this was aimed at thin content sites such as Mahalo and Demand Media properties. I for one am not convinced this will completely solve that problem. Time will tell.

On the flip side, there are some that were affected by this negatively and positively as is usually the case with these things. How might a legitimate site be negatively affected by nuking scrapers? Not really sure unless they’ve also dampened the links being passed form scrapers. I do know some folks that have benefited, so strong SEO should keep you safe (if you are having problems, please get in touch I may be able to help)

And on with the news!

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Talk of the Town 

Link Building 2011; what works and what doesn’t – this uber-awesome post had some of the brightest minds in link building talking about 4 tactics and what does and doesn’t work in 2011. Great stuff and a deffo must read for all.

Google’s Thoughts On Link Building Through Comment Spamming – Barry highlights an interesting thread on comment links (via Google) which includes, “Links that use the rel=nofollow microformat do not pass PageRank and are not used in our ranking algorithms.” – nuff said.

Is This Proof Directory Submission Still Works? – I am not entirely sure this PROVEs it, but it was still some interesting data from Shaun. Personally, strong domains, be they directories or other, still should be some value to them.

Paid Links V Content Programs
– and while we’re on the ‘links’ theme, I posted over on SEJ about some considerations when talking about the paid variety. A discussion that wasn’t really being had around the debate.

Google May Let You Blacklist Domains To Fight Spam – was another interesting footnote from Google which seems to imply that they may be looking at explicit feedback signals again (where users participate in the results). Will anything come of it? Hard to say, but given the interest in better results lately, entirely possible.

Finding potential link partners – Jennifer was over on SEW talking about link prospecting, she’s on a roll with links this week it seems. Are you down with the OPL?

Submitting To Article Aggregators Now Wasted Link Building? – also on SEW was a post that looked at the value behind article marketing these days. Personally, as far as I know, they are still working to some degree, will Google’s new move change that? We shall see.

Starting A New SEO Business In 2011? – not sure if you’ll want to laugh or cry, I was laughing my ass off personally. Great stuff Peter and thanks for the memories. For the record? I am the ass kicking consultant type that posts on forums.. (my own hehe).

Google’s Own Content Farm: Google Translate Spam – hee hee… Given the recent emphasis from Google on thin content, this whoops moment was kinda funny. And no, I don’t really think it counts, but Google sniping is a popular activity of late.

How To Build Agile SEO Tools Using Google Spreadsheets – what can one sasy about this? FREAKIN AMAZING. That’s what. I promoted this one from the ‘tools’ section as it was just WAY to awesome to be left down there. Go… Read… NOW.

10 Metrics to Check When Your Traffic Crashes – speaking of winners and losers from the recent algo changes, if you at any time ever experience some traffic crashes, this post has some good advice for areas to look at. These guys are on a roll lately. Keep up the good work.

Search Geeks Speak; Local SEO Panel – last week on the podcast we had a GREAT panel discussion on local SEO featuring Mike Blumenthal, Andrew Shotland and Darren Shaw. Some REALLY great stuff in there – give it a listen while you work!

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Search Geek Central

Search Geek Goodies

Social Search

Going Vertical

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Videos

Using Webmaster Tools like an SEO – Google

Google Targeting Content Farms, Spams Themselves  – Barry Schwartz

How Web Spam Is Impacting the Web and Google

Link Baiting Strategies for Social Media

Cutt’s Corner

How are site: results ranked?

How can I improve my linking on a Q&A site?

Weapons

A short and sweet list of some of my fav free SEO tools – We Build Pages

Using Page Level Google Analytics Custom Variables to report on SEO traffic by page type – Blogstorm

PPC as a SEO research tool – Rishi

Did You Know? Keyword targeting – Raven

Quick Nav LinksTalk of the TownGeek CentralSocial SearchGoing VerticalVideosToolsPatents

Search Patents

Google

Dynamically naming communities within online social networks

Document scoring based on link based criteria

Scoring local search results based on location prominence

Ranking social network objects

Selectively deleting clusters of conceptually related words from a generative model for text

Microsoft

Query classification based on query click logs

Scoring relevance of a document based on image text

Yahoo

Mining knowledge sources for improved entity extraction

Mining knowledge sources with auto learning for improved entity extraction

Presenting Search Results Based on User-Customizable Criteria

Segmentation of search topics in query logs


/end SOSG session

Quick Nav Links – Talk of the TownGeek CentralSocial Search Going VerticalVideosToolsPatents

Check out the SEO Tools guide at Search Engine Journal.

Weekly Search & Social News: 02/01/2011