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Just when you thought you’d had enough football (or maybe not enough, in some cases) FIFA, the international football organization revealed the logo design for the next world cup which will take place in Brazil in 2014. The new design entitled “Inspiration”, was the winning submission, chosen from 25 entries. The judging panel included famous Brazilians, model Gisele Bundchen and author Paulo Coelho. The logo was designed by Sao Paolo-based agency Africa .

See more here:
DesignFestival: Behind the Brazil 2014 World Cup Logo

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The Rio 2016 Olympic Games logo was unveiled on Copacabana Beach in Rio De Janeiro. The identity is made up of multi-colored figures holding hands over the Olympic rings, and the words Rio 2016 in a script typeface. It was designed by Brazilian agency Tatil . According to the organizers of the games, the new Rio 2016 emblem is inspired by the vision of “All Brazilians uniting to deliver the greatest festival on earth and proudly advancing our national promise of progress.” That’s a bit of a mouthful.

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DesignFestival: Dissecting the Rio 2016 Logo

The second Sunday in May is when the United States, Canada and a great many other countries around the world honor their mothers, celebrate motherhood and thank moms for all they do.

Since 2000 Google has marked the occasion every year with one of its infamous Google “Doodles,” transforming the classic homepage to a tribute to moms everywhere.

We’ve looked back this Mothering Sunday over a decade of mom-themed Doodles. Take a look through our gallery below and let us know which Doodle you’d like to dedicate to your mom in the comments below or via one of the share options to the top left.

2011

For this year, Google goes with a lovely yet simple design.

2010 — United States

Last year saw a great Google homepage for the United States made up of quirky glass vases…

2010 — Global

…While the rest of the world enjoyed a tulip-themed effort.

2009

The logo was pretty in pink in 2009 with a lovely bunch of blooms making up the “l.”

2008

This sweet scene sees a mother duck and two chicks decorating the famous logo.

2007

Children’s hand-drawn pictures are a cute touch on 2007’s Mother’s Day Doodle.

2006

Google said it with roses and entwined “os” back in ’06.

2005

The search giant keeps the floral theme going in 2005.

2004

A single pink rose adorns 2004’s offering.

2003

Another Mother’s Day, another vase of posies, again neatly taking the place of the “l.”

2002

A single red rose was Google’s offering to moms everywhere in 2002.

2001 & 2000

The original Mother’s Day Google Doodle appeared in the year 2000 and remained unchanged the next year. It linked to a tribute page to the then Googler’s moms.

A Tribute to Our Moms

And here is a grab of part of that page, still live today at Google.com/moms. With the sweet statement that “no search could find better moms than these,” Google illustrated the lyrics of Howard Johnson’s song M-O-T-H-E-R with portraits. Aw!

More About: design, galleries, gallery, Google, google doodles, List, Lists, logo design, logos, mothering sunday, mothers day, trending

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For the third and final installment in our three-part series on logo design, we’re taking a look at the simplicity of the logotype — a brand identity that contains only text.

Logotypes, like those of Facebook or Etsy, play on two important facets of design — typography and color — to the exclusion of other elements. They can be elegant and even clever, or they can fall flat. We’ll take a look at how a few examples walk that line.

Our panel of experts includes UK logo designer Graham Smith, designer and logo design blogger Jacob Cass and Raj Abhyanker, CEO of Trademarkia, a firm specializing in trademarks and logos.

Read on for their advice, and designers, please share your own experiences and opinions in the comments section.


How to Handle Logotypes


Smith is a fan of “strong and well executed” logotypes.

“We see them all the time in the fashion and retail stores, as well as the social networking sites Facebook and Twitter. The latter [are] the bolder and vibrant online variations of type-only logo designs that work to cut above all the visual noise one finds online. The Facebook logo brings a calm yet firm aesthetic.”

Smith pointed out that at the time Facebook’s logo was being designed, the trend was toward the “Web 2.0″ look of funky fonts and lots of transparency layers. But the young company “showed that a type-only logo in just one color needn’t be dull or useless.” He says that several of his clients have looked to the Facebook logo as guide for their own branding.

Cass shares his own “very generic” rule of thumb about logotypes: “If your company has a unique name, then you could get away with a logotype. But if you have a generic name, then you’re going to need something to identify the company by, which can be achieved by using a logo mark.”

He also says he enjoys seeing unique logotypes that incorporate interesting or “hidden” shapes into an otherwise simple logo. “I recently designed a logo for a company by the rather generic name of Redwave Systems. Rather than creating a mark for the business, I created a unique logotype by ‘hiding’ a wave in the logo.” A prominent example of a clever logo is the FedEx logo, which has an arrow between the E and X.

Abhyanker advises, however, that logotypes tend to be “less distinctive, more generic,” and many color and type combinations are common enough that they open the doors to potential trademark litigation.

“Ultimately,” Smith concludes, “it comes down to the brief, and what is needed visually to represent the client. If the brief and subsequent research leads you to a logotype as the best solution to represent the identity of a company, then that’s what you do.”


Chime In


We’d love to get your feedback in the comments. Designers, how would you have answered the questions we posed to the panel this week?

You can also take a look at the first post in the series, which focuses mainly on logo design for startups, and the second logo design post, which is all about spec work, contests, crowdsourcing and the dangerous allure of trendy logos.


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The Web Development Series is supported by Rackspace, the better way to do hosting. No more worrying about web hosting uptime. No more spending your time, energy and resources trying to stay on top of things like patching, updating, monitoring, backing up data and the like. Learn why.


More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


Ruby on Rails: Scaling Your App for Rapid Growth
HOW TO: Transfer Your Blog From WordPress.com to WordPress.org [VIDEO]
A Beginner’s Guide to Integrated Development Environments
10 Chrome Web Apps to Check Out
10 Tools for Getting Web Design Feedback

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, RichVintage

More About: design, graham smith, jacob cass, logo design, logo design series, startup design, trademarkia, web design, web development series

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The Web Development Series is supported by Rackspace, the better way to do hosting. Learn more about Rackspace’s hosting solutions here.

For the second installment of our three-part series on logo design, we’re taking a look at two of the larger areas of controversy in this field: trends and crowdsourcing.

While every brand obviously needs a logo that speaks to contemporary aesthetics, not all trends are good — in fact, once a trend becomes just so overused, watching it pop up again and again in new company logos can be downright painful.

And crowdsourced design, design “contests,” spec work and brand-in-a-bag design marketplaces have proliferated on the web and sparked new conversations about quality and ethics in the field.

To discuss these issues, we’ve rounded up a few experts. Our panel includes UK logo designer Graham Smith, designer and logo-design blogger Jacob Cass and Raj Abhyanker, CEO of Trademarkia, a firm specializing in trademarks and logos.

Read on for their advice, and designers, please share your own experiences and opinions in the comments section.


The Good, Bad & Ugly of Trendy Logos


Cass gets to the crux of the matter succinctly: “A good logo is distinctive, appropriate, practical, graphic, simple in form and conveys an intended message. If your logo can do this, then you shouldn’t worry about your logo being considered ‘trendy.’”

Smith says trends can be inspirations, but they should never be followed blindly. He says, “In terms of trends, I personally try not to get sucked into them. For me, a trend in logo design is sort of an oxymoron. For the most part, we strive to create timeless logo designs, yet the trend is typically a short-lived event.” Smith also notes that the benefits of trendy logo design, such as attention-grabbing and ego-bolstering, are equally short-lived.

So how do you go about getting inspiration from current trends without slavishly following them?

“It’s worth reminding yourself that you are ultimately designing for your client,” says Smith. “They are the ones paying and putting their trust in you. Design with the brief in mind, and only then look to current trends to see if there are any aspects that can be worked in to enhance the design for the right reasons.”

The “right reason” is a case in which the overall execution of the idea is solid and there are deeper meanings and associations tied in with the design — then a subtle inspiration by a trend can work out really well.

Abhyanker comes at the issue from a more practical angle. A logo that follows a common trend “associates the brand with a more popular company than yours,” he notes, “and can appeal to a hip crowd.”

But this is a blessing as much as it is a curse. “Likelihood of confusion” and “confusingly similar” are terms commonly used in trademark law, and if your trendy logo looks a little too much like Brand X’s trendy logo, you might be setting yourself up for a federal lawsuit.

He also notes that these “trendy” logos, because the same trends proliferate everywhere seemingly at once, end up looking generic rather than interesting or unique.


Crowdsourcing, Contests & Marketplaces


Smith calls the matter of spec work and design contests “the loaded question.”

“A risk of false economy; that’s how I would typically sum up the crowdsourcing route. It may seem financially attractive — if you have low funds, the lure of hundreds of designs from thousands of designers with a worldwide catchment area is certainly compelling.”

But in some cases, the results from a crowdsourcing site will be less that hiring a reputable designer. The overused and relevant phrase “You get what you pay for” is more than valid here, according to Smith.

Smith cites some of his own clients who had selected him to do logo design work after bad experiences with crowdsourcing sites. At that point, the clients had already invested time and money, but they were still in need of a usable, professional logo after the crowdsourcing process was done.

“They can often end up paying double — sometimes more than double — and it’s a real shame. It’s certainly a lesson learned in these cases, but it’s a bitter pill to swallow for these clients,” he says.

Still, if you’re convinced that a crowdsourcing site is the best or only option for you, Smith says, “Putting up a healthy reward will increase your chances of walking away with a sound design, and it injects more enthusiasm into the designers.”

When it comes to design contests, Cass has a harsher approach. “Don’t get me started on these contest sites,” he says.

“They should be avoided at all costs. There are no benefits to anyone; and in fact, you could be doing more harm than good to your business by using these contest sites. Make your choices wisely,” he says.

Cass holds a strong — and not uncommon — position on
spec work
, that is, work done free of charge as part of the bidding process. Also called free pitching, this kind of work is the result of a company broadcasting the message, “We need a logo, someone design one for us and we will pick the one we like.”

Cass says design contests are the most common form of spec work these days, and for clients, he says the downsides include the possibility of plagiarized material, inferior quality, limited or no revisions, no relationship with the designer and worse.

As far as the concerns about plagiarism, Cass’s fears are echoed by Abhyanker, who says that logos obtained this way may be recycled from other designs or may later be reused by the designer, leading up to “potential trademark litigation” later.

“It does seem like many of the designers of these sites reuse the same basic designs for various contests — they just keep re-submitting them. You really need to look at the contests they have entered in the past and what else they have submitted for those,” Abkyanker says. “It is quite possible that the mark you choose is nearly identical to a mark that another company is using or about to use, and this could lead to infringement cases down the road — or, in a more immediate sense, a need to change your logo so that you are not simply a copy-cat of another company.”

As for marketplace-type sites where smaller, newer companies can purchase all-in-one packages with branding collateral (including logos), URLs, web templates and more, Smith says these sites can be a lifesaver for companies that are pressed for time.


Chime In & Stay Tuned


We’ll have more from these experts in the weeks to come, but in the meantime, we’d love to get your feedback in the comments. Designers, how would you have answered the questions we posed to the panel this week?

You can also take a look at the first post in the series, which focuses mainly on logo design for startups.


Series Supported by Rackspace


rackspace

The Web Development Series is supported by Rackspace, the better way to do hosting. No more worrying about web hosting uptime. No more spending your time, energy and resources trying to stay on top of things like patching, updating, monitoring, backing up data and the like. Learn why.


More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


Ruby on Rails: Scaling Your App for Rapid Growth
HOW TO: Transfer Your Blog From WordPress.com to WordPress.org [VIDEO]
A Beginner’s Guide to Integrated Development Environments
10 Chrome Web Apps to Check Out
10 Tools for Getting Web Design Feedback

image courtesy of iStockphoto, TommL.

More About: design, graham smith, jacob cass, logo design, logo design series, startup design, trademarkia, web design, web development series

For more Dev & Design coverage: