Jacob Gube is the founder/chief editor of Six Revisions, a popular web development and design site, and the deputy editor of Design Instruct, a web magazine for designers. He has more than seven years of experience as a professional web developer and has written a book on JavaScript. Connect with him via Twitter.

There’s never been a more exciting time to be a web designer; but being a member of this fast-paced, persistently metamorphic profession, I’ll probably end up saying this at the end of every year until I retire.

But with the web design industry abuzz with new specifications like HTML5 and CSS3, and cutting-edge frontiers like the mobile web, I can’t help but wonder what the future will look like in the new year. Here are four predictions for the future of web design.


1. Mobile Web Goes Mainstream


The mobile web has been the dominant subject in web design for the past 2+ years. A quick peek at Dribbble, a social media site where designers share their projects, will show you that many of us are working on mobile device apps and interfaces.

However, it’s still safe to say that most websites have given little to no attention to their mobile web presence. Most of the innovative mobile device web designs we’re seeing are on big, industry-leading, tech-centric sites such as Amazon.com, Google, and Digg, or niche sites targeted toward web designers (such as A List Apart).

Where we’re not seeing mobile web design implementations are in run-of-the-mill company and corporate sites. Small- and medium-sized businesses, Fortune 500 companies, and government websites are sadly falling behind instead of in line.

However, companies are beginning to see the rewards of meeting the needs of mobile device users. In the years to come, there will be a significant shift in attention toward the mobile web presence in all websites.

There are already several mobile web tools you can use for creating a mobile web version of your site; it’s time companies seriously look into implementing these cost-effective and relatively simple solutions as either a stop-gap solution or a permanent one.


2. Web Design as a Profession Will Become Specialized


Web designers are increasingly contending with many roles and tasks. What used to be just HTML, CSS and designing static brochure sites for the desktop has extended to designing web-enabled solutions for mobile devices, web apps, rich Internet application (RIA) interfaces, content management systems (CMS) and much more.

We’re tasked with making harmonious designs that carry a website’s brand across all platforms and situations — designs that establish the company’s brand whether it’s being viewed in a 28-inch desktop monitor or an Android smartphone.

This leads to two things. Job security is one, but the other is the need to distribute these tasks so that we can specialize and excel in one specific area.

In the future, there will be greater stratification of the role of web designer. Right now, web app designers, mobile app designers and traditional website designers are clustered under the umbrella title of “web designer.”

Just as the profession of being a doctor and the field of medicine are branched out into sub-fields such as oncology, dentistry and neurology, we may see a similar division in the field of web design. I can see specializations such as mobile web designer, content management system designer (with further sub-specializations such as WordPress theme designer or Drupal theme designer), and RIA interface designer becoming a reality and being in demand as we move forward.


3. Simpler Aesthetics for Websites


There’s been a sweeping trend in the way new websites are being visually designed. Web designers are forgoing complex visuals and overdone design techniques, opting instead for clean and simple web designs with a high attention to detail, a greater emphasis on typography — with the help of web fonts and the upcoming open web font format (WOFF) specifications — and stronger interaction design for richer and more captivating user experiences.

Not only that, but simpler aesthetics means lighter web pages, which translates to a better experience on mobile devices where Internet connectivity is lower in speed and less reliable when compared to the traditional broadband connection, and where screen sizes are too small to fit excessive design elements. This web design trend of “less is more” seems like it will extend, if not dominate, the aesthetic tastes of web designers in the near future.


4. Web Design Will Replace Print Design (Even More)


Print designers are typically tasked with brand identity design, such as logo design, letterheads, business cards and other print materials.

However, companies are seeing the great opportunities and effectiveness of business networking online. Businesses are a lot more concerned about their brand’s visibility on the web. Business cards are being replaced by social networking profiles on Twitter and Facebook. Newsletters, brochures and company letterheads sent out by snail mail are being dismissed for HTML e-mails and e-newsletters.

We’ll be witnessing design budgets earmarked toward traditionally print-based branding materials shift toward web design solutions such as Twitter profile page designs, Facebook fan page designs and HTML e-mail and e-newsletter template designs.


Where Do You See Web Design Heading?


If you’re a web designer or are in a related profession, what changes do you see us heading toward? If you’re not a web designer, what things do you want to see in web designs, and what things do you want to become history? Share your thoughts in the comments.


More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


10 Predictions for Web Development in 2011
5 Free Annotation and Collaboration Tools for Web Projects
8 Tools For Easily Creating a Mobile Version of Your Website
Hacker Web Design: Words of Wisdom for Building Great Apps
5 Design Trends That Small Businesses Can Use in 2011

Image courtesy of Flickr, Mike Rohde.

More About: design, List, Lists, mobile web design, predictions-2011, web design, Web Development

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Whether you want to improve your existing skills or learn new ones, we’ve provided plenty of web design and development resources in the past year.

Here we recap the best posts that fell into this creative category. These include a wealth of tutorials, resources, galleries, interviews and more.

Have a read below for a look back at Mashable‘s Dev and Design resources from 2010, and be sure to keep coming back next year for more.


Mobile Development Resources





google phones

Whatever mobile platform(s) you favor, we’ve got you covered.


Icon Resources


From minimal to festive, here’s a roundup of great icon galleries.


Resources for Web Developers


PHP tips? Check. Apps for developers? Check. Online resources? Check.


Apple-Related Resources


The iPad made an impact on dev and design this year. Here’s why.


Photoshop Resources


Photoshop is one of the primary tools in the digital designer’s belt. We got you up and running with the imaging software in 2010.


Career Resources


Whatever career path you’re following in the online dev and design world, these articles can help.


Web Design


We’ve offered a wealth of design-related resources this year — dive in!


Interviews


From iconic designers to icon designers, we’ve talked to some rather interesting folk during the past 12 months.


Fun Resources


It’s not all work, work, work as we add a little fun with these light-hearted articles.




As a class, developers have had a fantastic year in 2010.

We’ve made headlines, grabbed the limelight, been vilified and glorified beyond all reason and gotten paid pretty nicely along the way. And the bubble of consumer web apps just continues to swell, so there are no signs (yet) that 2011 will bring anything short of grandeur for the web and mobile development communities.

Looking ahead to what the coming year might hold, there are a few sure bets and a few speculations we’d like to offer. Some are, as noted, almost certainly bound to come true. Others are more along the lines of hopes and prayers than hard-and-fast predictions we’d stake money on.

With that in mind, here are 10 things we think the world of hacking will hold in 2011.


1. There Will Be a Need to Understand and Optimize for All Form Factors


Even the most brainless of “social media gurus” could tell you this one. With the surging popularity and newfound accessibility and affordability of smartphones — thanks in large part to the growth of the Android platform — we’ve had to optimize for the mobile web and learn about mobile applications a lot in the past year in particular.

Now, as tablets begin to creep into the market, we’re having to craft new experiences for those, as well. We’re constantly forced to consider form factor when creating new sites and apps. Will it run Flash? What about screen resolution? Font size?

Almost every developer worth his or her salt will have to become increasingly adept at developing for the myriad form factors set to dominate the gadget market in 2011.


2. There Will Be Breakout, Cross-Platform Mobile Development Tools


With all the mobile growth that’s been occurring, especially given the current state of the iOS/Android market shares, the time has never been riper for a great mobile framework, SDK or IDE to enter the arena.

Hopefully, sometime in 2011, we’ll see a new group of flexible and robust tools that can facilitate app development for any number of operating systems — including tablet-specific or forked OSes. We’re talking more than WYSIWYG, DIY app-builders and more than iPhone-to-Android porting tools; we want to see serious, mobile-centric power tools in 2011.


3. Investment in Cloud-Based, Collaborative Development Tools


We’ve seen some interesting starts in community-based, online coding. There are a few collaborative code editing apps, some of them with real-time capabilities.

We’re looking forward to seeing more and better apps for cloud-based, collaborative coding in 2011 — something like a better Wave, created specifically with hackers in mind. This will allow for better and faster work to be generated by an increasingly decentralized hacker community. It’ll also pave the way for improved on-the-job learning and open-source hacking.


4. WYSIWYG Tools Get Better and Grow


While WYSIWYG tools of the past — and, who are we kidding, the present — often lead to spaghetti code of the ugliest variety, we just keep seeing more and more of them.

We’re going out on a limb and predicting (or hoping) that WYSIWYG and split-screen (WYSIWYG and code) developer tools become more sophisticated. Whether they get better or not, they’re definitely going to continue to proliferate, especially for the novice coder and the DIY non-coder markets. Still, we’re being told the code on the other side of the GUIs is getting better all the time.

Who knows? 2011 could be the year WYSIWYGs stop sucking.


5. We’ll Keep Building “Touchable,” App-like UIs


Facebook Mobile Privacy

All that stuff we said earlier about form factors kind of applies here, too, but in reverse. Your sites will have to look better on mobile devices and tablets, yes; but also, they’ll continue to natively look and feel more like mobile and tablet apps.

Some folks, a couple of Mashable staffers included, aren’t happy about the app-itization of the entire Internet. Call us old-fashioned, but we like our websites to be websites and our mobile apps to be mobile apps.

The average consumer, however, seems to delight in the shiny, touchable, magazine-like interfaces taking over the iPad and similar devices. Expect to be asked to make more and more app-like sites in 2011.


6. There Will Be a Higher Standard for Web and Mobile Security


The past year has been a bit of a horror show when it comes to web security. There have been a handful of high-profile hacks that exposed user data to the world; there was also much confusion on the user’s side of the screen as to how security works on a personal level.

We predict — nay, we dream — that in 2011, developers of consumer-facing apps will be extra careful with things like data encryption, user privacy controls and other security issues.


7. Third-Party App Development Will Plateau


Building a Facebook app or a Twitter app was all the rage in 2009, but something shifted in 2010, right around the time of Twitter’s Chirp developer conference: Developers found out that building on someone else’s platform was a good way to set yourself up for failure, especially when the platform decides to shift direction, change its APIs, acquire a competitor, or simply change its terms of use.

We predict that developing these kinds of apps will plateau and even taper off in 2011. The web is glutted with third-party social media tools; many devs are beginning to realize there’s more money and more interesting challenges elsewhere. In the end, social networks will be more interesting to advertisers large and small than to independent and third-party developers.


8. Ruby Will Get Some Cool Optimizations and Tools


We’ve seen lots of cool tricks and optimization tweaks around Python and PHP; 2011, however, will be the year for better Ruby tools.

The Ruby language is becoming extremely popular in developing consumer-facing web apps, and we’re sure to see some big-name companies release open-source tools and even improvements to the Ruby core — think along the lines of what Facebook did last year with HipHop or Google’s Unladen Swallow project.


9. NoSQL Technologies Will Stake Their Ground


We’ve seen and heard interesting things from the NoSQL corners of the web this year… and by “interesting,” we don’t necessarily mean “good.”

NoSQL technologies have had some high-profile hiccups this year (remember that MongoDB/Foursquare disaster?), but we’ve been assured that what doesn’t kill NoSQL only makes it stronger and more stable.

That being said, we’re not predicting the demise of MySQL any time soon. As one astute Twitter friend wrote, “Relational databases have their place, as do NoSQL solutions. To blindly choose one over the other is shortsighted.”


10. Open-Source Software Will See Unprecedented Growth


Open-sourcing interesting or unused tech is a trend we like to see from companies like Google and Facebook. In fact, we hope to see even more open-source contributions from proprietary software giants in 2011.

It’s not just the big players who are writing great open-source code. We know a lot of web startups are working on internal tools that’ll also be open-sourced in 2011. There are more youngsters (and not-so-youngsters) joining the ranks of hackers every year; many of them are being encouraged by sites like this one to make valuable contributions to the open-source community.

We predict more awesome open-source software than ever in 2011. Will it be a victory by Stallman‘s standards? Probably not, as it won’t be exclusive of proprietary software creation, sale and licensing. But the trend toward more FOSS is a good one, and one that we’ll continue to report on in the year to come.


What Are Your Predictions?


In the comments, let us know your predictions for what 2011 may bring to the world of web and mobile development. And if you disagree with our predictions, let us know. They’re only educated guesses, after all; join the conversation.


More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


HOW TO: Make the Most of TextMate
Hacker Web Design: Words of Wisdom for Building Great Apps
5 Better Ways to Read “Hacker News”
A Beginner’s Guide to Integrated Development Environments
10 Chrome Web Apps to Check Out

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, loops7

More About: app development, coding, developers, development, hack, hacking, List, Lists, predictions, predictions-2011, web design, Web Development

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This post originally appeared on the American Express OPEN Forum, where Mashable regularly contributes articles about leveraging social media and technology in small business.

Specific, contextual feedback is crucial for teams collaborating online, which is why it’s so important to make receiving it as fast, efficient and easy as possible. Asking for feedback can be tedious and is often done out of context, for example, via e-mail.

However there are numerous tools available to make the task of gathering and giving feedback for web projects simpler and swifter. This article is interested in those that focus on annotation and are available freely to the widest possible audience.

Here are five of the best free tools to annotate and collaborate on the web. If you’re partial to a particular tool available, let us know in the comments.


1. MarkUp.io


MarkUp lets you express your thoughts and ideas quickly and easily on any webpage. Because it’s browser based, it doesn’t require any download or installation. You can just drag the Get MarkUp icon into your bookmarks or favorites bar. When you visit a website, just click the MarkUp bookmarklet to load the toolbar, so you can begin annotation.

When you click the publish button and slide to confirm, you will receive a unique URL with the image and notes captured, making it easy to share with anyone, seeking feedback where necessary. For those visiting a MarkUp URL, you will see a respond button. When you press this, you can either keep the old annotations or start afresh with just the original image.

The MarkUp toolbar is simple and effective with five different drawing tools to choose from, and should the toolbar happen to get in the way, you can just drag it over using one of the two buttons located on each end of it.

A neat feature is the ability to use Ctrl + Z to undo your previous action if you make a mistake, and the backspace key will remove the element from the page.


2. Bounce App


Bounce is a lightweight application for giving quick feedback on a web page. You enter the URL you want to annotate, add your notes, and then share your feedback with anyone you want. It’s free for everyone, has no logins or accounts, has no limit on who you share your feedback with and doesn’t require any software to be installed. It’s actually the lightweight version of ZURB’s Notable app.

Just input the URL of the webpage that requires feedback and hit the grab screenshot button. A rather fun bouncing ball appears as the screenshot is processed. The screenshot of the webpage is then displayed with the controls at the top. It’s a good idea to enter your name before you begin, so all the comments are labeled in your name. Then click on the specific portion of the screenshot where you’d like to leave feedback and click and drag the mouse over this. A box will then appear where you can add your comment and click OK.

All comments are numbered sequentially, so knowing the order of priority is simple. You can add a name to the screenshot and click save to get a public URL, which you can distribute to anyone. There are also the neat options of sending the link directly to Facebook and Twitter. The people you’ve shared your page with can make their own notes, save them and bounce them back.

It’s also worth noting that TinyBounce, the smaller, sleeker little brother to Bounce was created for the 10K EventApart competition and received a Notable Mention.


3. SharedCopy


SharedCopy is a bookmarklet that allows you to share and mark up webpages. Once you drag the SharedCopy icon to your bookmarks toolbar, you can then click this bookmark whenever you need to make an annotated copy of a page.

You can add text notes, simple lines and shapes, and highlights to the page. When you’re done, click save and grab the unique URL for your SharedCopy page and share it with anyone for a simple way to collaborate. Saving essentially creates a ‘separate copy’ of the webpage with its own URL, containing your annotations. You can set your pages to be published (public) or private – a person must then know the URL to access it.

Anyone can immediately use SharedCopy as a guest without any registration, although you can create an account, which gives you access to further features such as:

  • Moderation and Notification: Know when someone comments on your copy and moderate other commenters.
  • Profile and RSS: Upload a profile image, gather all your copies in a blog-like archive and share them through RSS.
  • Add-Ons and Integrations: Sync with your blog, bug tracker, Twitter, Basecamp, Tumblr, FriendFeed, Backpack and Delicious.

With several API’s available, it’s also possible to integrate SharedCopy into your own services.


4. WebKlipper


WebKlipper allows you to easily annotate web pages with virtual post-it notes and a highlighter. Once you enter the page URL, WebKlipper will open the site with a menu bar displayed at the bottom. It then generates a unique URL that you can share with the rest of your team members. Once they open this URL, they will see the page with your annotations. When you’ve created your Klip, you’re also able to edit both its title and its unique URL.

By selecting a piece of text and clicking ‘Highlight,’ it gives the selected text a yellow background. Once created, comments can be resized and repositioned. By clicking ‘Share,’ you can share the URL of the annotated page via e-mail or directly through Twitter and Facebook.

In the menu bar is the link to Notifications, which are a quick and easy way of keeping track of updates on a Klip. Once you add yourself to the notification list for the selected Klip, you’ll start getting e-mails from the creator and modifiers of it. You are also able to view the original page and the different versions of the Klip for quick access to its version history.

WebKlipper also allows you to annotate images and PDFs by uploading these to its website.


5. Diigo


An abbreviation for the “Digest of Internet Information, Groups and Other stuff,” Diigo is a social annotation service that lets users add highlights and notes in situ to any web page. Any annotation can be made either public or private, with other Diigo users able to read public comments and reply/interact to comments. Diigo combines aspects of social bookmarking, annotation, full-text search, tagging, and sharing. You can also upload images that can be tagged and shared with your group.

A browser add-on allows you to share your annotations with others or send directly to Twitter, Facebook, Delicious or your blog. It has an impressive suite of tools, which are worth checking out, from browser extensions to a Diigo API.

The groups feature is an excellent collaborative research and learning tool that allows any group of people to pool their findings through group bookmarks, highlights, sticky notes and a forum. With group sticky notes, group members can interact and discuss important points right on the web page, preserving the original context. You can choose to make your group public, private or semi-private.

Tags and lists provide two different ways to organize information. Tags are best for diverse and disparate information, while lists are best for focused information. You can use lists to organize, share and display a specific collection of bookmarks. Another neat feature is the ability to play, browse and annotate any list of URLs as an interactive slideshow.

Are you currently using any of these tools? If so, please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.


More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


What Does Web Design Say About Your Small Business?
5 Design Trends That Small Businesses Can Use in 2011
10 Free WordPress Themes for Small Businesses
5 Beautiful Tumblr Themes for Small Businesses
10 Free Drupal Themes for Small Business

Image courtesy of Flickr, Mykl Roventine


Reviews: Basecamp, Delicious, Diigo, Facebook, Flickr, FriendFeed, Tumblr, Twitter

More About: annotation, annotations, bounce app, collaboration, collaborations, collaborative tools, design, development, diigo, List, Lists, markup, sharedcopy, web apps, web design, webklipper

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This post originally appeared on the American Express OPEN Forum, where Mashable regularly contributes articles about leveraging social media and technology in small business.

As an entrepreneur, you’re most likely always on the lookout for new developments. Perhaps your customers are reporting that your site needs a mobile version so that they can visit it while they’re on the go, or maybe you recently saw a competitor’s site through your mobile device; it looked slick, and now you’re feeling outclassed.

The mobile web is burgeoning. Usage of iOS, the operating system for Apple mobile devices such as the iPhone and iPad, almost doubled in just seven months (from March 2010 to October 2010), according to Netmarketshare. This is an indicator of just how many people are browsing websites, more and more, through their mobile devices instead of their computers.

Small businesses should be on top of this trend. To help out, we’ve compiled a list of easy-to-use tools for creating mobile sites. The tools in this list were purposely chosen for ease of use — that is, they’re all aimed at site owners who don’t have any web development/coding experience. They’re perfect solutions for small- and medium-sized businesses because of their cost effectiveness (and most are even free).


How These Tools Work


Most of the tools below have graphical user interfaces and copy-and-paste code blocks that can be installed on your site quite easily. If you can install a tool like Google Analytics on your site yourself, you’ll be able to use these tools.

These tools work by detecting the user agent of your site visitors, which is just fancy talk for finding out whether a visitor is using a regular web browser or a mobile web browser. If the user agent is a mobile browser, users are redirected to your website’s mobile version. The common practice is to assign the mobile version of your site with a sub-domain as such m.yourwebsite.com. In this manner, your site traffic is forked into two segments, giving all of your site visitors an optimal browsing experience.


1. Mobify


Mobify allows you to create a mobile version of your website through an intuitive and user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI). Setup is a breeze, and you can have your very own mobile site in minutes.

If you run an e-commerce store, even better! Mobify has the Mobile Commerce platform that’s geared specifically toward e-stores for the mobile web.

Mobify runs on a freemium model, but its free version is very generous and includes the option for a custom domain (such as m.yourwebsite.com). The paid plans start at $249 per month and include features such as the removal of the Mobify logo on your mobile site, mobile analytics for reporting site traffic stats, and so on.


2. Wirenode


Companies such as Ford, Nokia and Reebok use Wirenode, a mobile website generator that has helped more than 50,000 websites create mobile-device-friendly versions of their sites.

Its free plan has a user-friendly editor for designing your mobile site, free hosting for up to three mobile sites, website statistics reporting, and more. The paid plans start at 15 Euros per month (about $19.80 USD), with upgrades such as support for custom domains and the removal of Wirenode advertisements.


3. Mippin Mobilizer


If you’re strapped for time, Mippin Mobilizer is a no-frills tool that will take you minutes to use. All you have to do is enter your site’s RSS feed URL, configure some options, sign up for an account, install some code on your site, and you’re done! As you set up your mobile site, it has a live preview on the right-hand-side so that you can see the progression of your site’s design as you configure it.


4. Onbile


Onbile promises that you can have a mobile version of your site in five minutes or less. It delivers this promise by giving you an intuitive user interface for constructing your mobile site and a custom-generated script to paste into your index page so that when mobile device users visit your site, they are redirected to the mobile version. You can select one of 13 customizable templates as a starting point for your mobile site design.


5. Winksite


If you’re interested in creating an online community based around your mobile site, check out Winksite, a web app for building a mobile community for your website.

It even generates your very own QR code, a two-dimensional code readable by mobile devices with QR scanners and used to automatically pull up text, photos, videos, music and URLs. There are many ways to use QR codes for small business marketing. You can print your QR code on your business card, print ads and other branding materials, and when mobile users want to visit your mobile site, they just need to use their mobile device cameras to scan the QR code.

If you would like to generate a QR code without having to use Winksite, check out this free web-based tool called QR-Code Generator.


6. MobilePress


Do you use the WordPress publishing platform for your website? If so, you’re in luck because there’s a bevy of plug-and-play WordPress plugins for automatically generating a mobile version of your website. One such plugin is MobilePress, a free WordPress plugin for creating a mobile theme for your WordPress-powered site. Another WordPress plugin to consider is WordPress Mobile Edition.


7. iWebKit


iWebKit is a simple framework for creating your own iPhone/iPod touch apps. It can be used to create an app like Mashable‘s iPhone app, for example.

Though iWebKit can be used by anyone, even without knowledge of HTML, it isn’t as user-friendly as the other tools mentioned above and requires that you download and install the app as well as read the user manual. But for a small time investment (no cash needed, the iWebKit framework is free), you can have your very own iPhone app just like the big kids.


8. MoFuse


MoFuse is loaded with a large set of features for building and managing your mobile site. It’s aimed at agencies, news media, and small- and medium-sized businesses. Prices range from $7.95 to $199 per month and include features such as site analytics reporting, support for more than 5,000 different mobile devices, customer support, a QR code manager, and more.


Bonus: Resources for Testing and Evaluation


Once you use one of the tools above and have your very own mobile version of your main site, it’s a good practice to ensure that everything’s in order. Here are additional tools and resources for testing and evaluating your new mobile website.

  • mobiReady – This tool will test your site for dotMobi compliance and W3C mobileOK compliance, sets of mobile website standards that ensure an optimal and accessible mobile-site user experience. It also looks for errors and gives you a user-friendly report of any errors discovered. It’s easy to use — just plug in the URL of your mobile site.
  • W3C mobileOK Checker – W3C has an official tool for checking a mobile site’s “mobile-friendliness”.
  • iPad Peek – Don’t have an iPad? That’s quite alright, you can still see how your mobile site looks through the popular Apple mobile device using this tool that emulates what people see on the iPad.
  • Mobile Web Best Practices 1.0 – W3C, the standards body for many of the web’s technologies (such as CSS, HTML and JavaScript), has a document that outlines mobile web best practices. This is aimed at web developers and can be a pretty dry read, but it’s worth a few moments to read and look over it.

More Business Resources from Mashable:


5 Design Trends That Small Businesses Can Use in 2011
10 Free WordPress Themes for Small Businesses
5 Beautiful Tumblr Themes for Small Businesses
10 Free Drupal Themes for Small Business
5 Big Social Media Questions from Small Business Owners


Reviews: Google Analytics, WordPress

More About: business, iwebkit, List, Lists, mippin mobilizer, mobify, mobile sites, mobile web, mobile web design, mobile web development, mobilepress, mofuse, onbile, small business, winksite, wirenode

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