Brett Miller is the president of Custom Software by Preston (CSP). For more than 10 years, CSP has impressed clients with highly effective software solutions and teams of multi-talented software engineers.

Remember the old 80/20 rule? The same applies to software development inquiries, as in 20% of sales inquiries result in 80% of new sales volume. The challenge is being able to identify which inquiries will be fruitful, and which will only cost you time and effort.

Potential clients expect accurate estimates — clearly a reasonable request. For any developer, accurate estimates are a time consuming and challenging task because custom software development and technology are constantly changing, and it’s not the same as buying an off-the-shelf item.

Even worse, many prospects decide not to move forward with their project at all (with any vendor). It’s not because the bidders did anything wrong, but because the client did not realize the full extent of the commitment required (usually defined by cost).

I have spent 15 years of my career in software development, both as a freelance developer and as a business owner. That practical experience has taught me to quickly recognize which potential projects are going to move forward and which are just not worth pursuing. There are Seven Axioms I use to help identify the solid opportunities.


1. Documented Requirements


If the client took the time to write down what they want, it is a strong indicator that they are serious. Otherwise, you will need to do this for them. Then time and documentation flows back and forth until a project’s parameters are finalized.

Rule: Lean toward clients who have taken the initiative in identifying and drafting their own software project requirements.


2. Urgent Need


This goes right to the heart of the matter. Is software development a logical next step in their growth or does it seem more whimsical/experimental in nature? For example, does the software project tie in to the launch of a new product without which, they might falter?

Rule: Lean toward projects that have an immediate nature, where the client absolutely needs it done.


3. Deal With the Decision Makers


Many times decision makers send underlings to gather the initial project information and specifications. In my experience, information gathering usually results in little else. Decision makers are involved when projects are deemed critical.

Rule: Lean toward projects where you work directly with the decision makers — the ones who steer the project and identify priorities.


4. Budgeted Project


Could anything be more critical than having realistic expectations about the cost of development? Many prospects may have misconceptions about cost, which is further exacerbated by vendors who shy away from early discussion on the subject. Sales professionals consider rough estimates to be an important applied mechanism of the trial close, potentially saving many hours of time and effort.

Rule: Use rough estimates to measure a client’s continuing interest. You could say something like, “Based on these preliminary estimates, does it make sense for us to take the next step?”


5. Process and Timeframe


Questions about the bidding process and timeframe should be addressed up front to uncover internal processes (like board reviews) or external influences (like venture capital availability). If the process seems extensive or the time frame is not well-defined, there is good reason to question if the project will ever happen.

Rule: Realize that the quality of your work and the accuracy of your estimate will not win the project if their timeframes or processes are inhibited by roadblocks. Lean toward projects that have appropriate funding, immediate need and the attention of decision makers.


6. How do I Earn the Business?


Asking about the client’s selection criteria make sense. If they haven’t already done so, they need to think about these things now and you need to know the rules of the game. Their processes and criteria may even play into the overall desirability of the project.

Rule: Understanding what is required to get the job reveals a lot about what it might be like to have the job. Do you even want to work within the structure and environment the client creates?


7. Show Me Some Money!


Your time and expertise has value. It is not that unusual for a potential client to be looking for a free consultation, which may only be used internally (if at all). If possible, ask the client for a small amount to put together the initial requirements and specifications for the project. If they are willing to spend real hard cash on developing the specifications, they are really serious about the project (and you as a potential vendor).

Rule: Initial project analysis, documentation drafting and identifying deliverables take considerable time and effort. Describe the process to the client and don’t be afraid to ask for payment for these services.


Sophistication, Process and Specifics


Legitimately qualified software development opportunities can be summarized in three words: sophistication, process and specifics. You need all three in your approach to the sales cycle and should expect all three in return.

Sophistication is about the approach to the project, indicating that available information and outcomes have been given thorough consideration upfront. Process relates to both parties understanding the steps and effort it will take to achieve success. Specifics have to do with identifying and sharing the salient properties of all project parameters — before, during, and after the project.

Approach every potential project with these factors in mind and you will know which ones are worthy of your attention, leading you down the path to a sale.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, peepo

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Weekends at Mashable mean the weekly features roundup is coming at’cha. You ready to rock this list?

This week, we spent some quality time with Siri, and now we can’t live without her. Then, we moved on to the Motorola Droid Razr, following the past week’s event with Verizon. Curious about our review? Read on. Then skip over to a gallery of rapture photos — or rather, what’s going to happen when the world ends. While you’re waiting for the apocalypse, we suggest you catch up on your reading…


Editor’s Picks



Social Media


For more social media news and resources, you can follow Mashable’s social media channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.


Tech & Mobile


For more tech news and resources, you can follow Mashable’s tech channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.


Business & Marketing


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More About: Business, Features Week In Review, List, Mobile, Social Media, web





If you’re seeking a job in social media, we’d like to help out. For starters, Mashable‘s Job Lists section gathers together all of our resource lists, how-tos and expert guides to help you get hired. In particular, you might want to see our articles on How to Leverage Social Media for Career Success and How to Find a Job on Twitter.

But we’d like to help in a more direct way, too. Mashable‘s job boards are a place for socially savvy companies to find people like you. This week and every week, Mashable features its coveted job board listings for a variety of positions in the web, social media space and beyond. Have a look at what’s good and new on our job boards:


Mashable Job Postings


Community Intern at Mashable in New York, NY.


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Mashable Job Board Listings


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Social Media Manager at LivingSocial in Washington, D.C.


Interactive Producer/ Daring Truth Seeker at SANBORN MEDIA FACTORY in New York, NY.


Digital Marketing Designer/Editor at xMatters, Inc. in Dublin, CA.


SEO Manager at Leading Online News Destination in Los Angeles, CA.


Senior Web Developer (Ruby on Rails) at Memory Reel in Dallas, TX.


Director, Product Marketing at New Relic in San Francisco, CA.


Jr. Interactive Digital Artist at CP+B in Boulder, CO.


Social Media Officer at Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, D.C.


ColdFusion Application Developer at Fusionapps in Secaucus, NJ.


Associate SEO Strategist at Morpheus Media in New York, NY.


Interactive Savvy Graphic Designer/Art Director at Bill Young Productions Inc. in Houston, TX.


Paid Online Innovation Internships with MoveOn Labs at MoveOn.org in Berkeley, CA.


Developer Advocate at Atlassian in San Francisco, CA.


Online Communications Manager – South Asia Region at The World Bank in Washington, D.C.


Email Marketing Manager at Inman News in Alameda, CA.


Content and Community Development Manager at Loehmann’s in Bronx, NY.


Product Manager – Local Business Products at Yelp Inc. in San Francisco, CA.


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Mashable‘s Job Board has a variety of web 2.0, application development, business development and social networking job opportunities available. Check them out here.

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More About: COMMUNICATIONS, design, jobs, List, Social Media





David Williams is VP of technology at Coupa, which provides cloud spend management solutions for customers like Salesforce.com, Rent-A-Center, Amazon and SUBWAY. You can follow David on Twitter @metakube and on the company blog, Coupa Cabana.

Your company just on-boarded another software product that promises to make work better, faster and easier. If you’re familiar with traditional enterprise software, you probably found yourself rolling your eyes already. But some newer players are giving the dinosaurs a run for their money by focusing on simplification and usability. Not all business software is created equal, and there are some principles to keep in mind to identify truly better business software.

So, how do you spot better business software?


It’s Usable


I can’t stress this enough. The usability of a product is key to its adoption and implementation. When examining a new software product, ask yourself and others: Do you understand what it’s doing without taking a seminar? When it surprises you, are the surprises good or bad? (Frustration doesn’t tend to help adoption.) Is the learning curve comparable to my iPhone or Kindle? How much (if any) training will be required?

One way to gauge if a technology is usable for everyone — from IT, to marketing, to sales — is to form a technology focus group. “Focus group” can be a dirty term, and you don’t have to call it that, but make sure the groups of people that will use the software day-to-day get a say in it, or there’s a good chance you’ll end up with shelfware. Gathering folks at different levels and in different departments to test-drive the product will help determine if it’s truly easy to use and may help create buy-in early on.


It Has Structure


Business software benefits from certain constraints, and it’s important to understand how the structure of the software you’re evaluating maps to your own company structure and processes. In today’s marketplace, we’ve come to expect the ability to customize any product to our personal preferences. The same thinking often holds sway when selecting business software, and it’s not always healthy.

Structure should encourage best practices, discourage bad ones and map as cleanly as possible to your own company structure and processes. One of the most challenging aspects of building enterprise software is maintaining structure cleanly from release to release, and this plays a large role in determining which features to build. My company believes strongly in the 80/20 rule — 20% of the features will be used 80% of the time, and those features in the 20% group are likely to remain consistent throughout our customer base. Customization at the code level may or may not be on the table, but I strongly discourage it. In addition to the often significant upfront cost, there are innumerable tangible and intangible costs down the road, and there’s a decent chance you’ll compromise the structure.


It’s Flexible and Fast


As much as business software should have structure, it also needs flexibility within that structure.  Completely inflexible design will make it very difficult to add new departments, create new functions specific to your industry or business, or remove things that generate more problems than they fix. It will also lead you to resort to customization, increasing costs and time-to-value.

In addition to flexibility, the software should also be fast and agile, allowing for modifications and enhancements to be made and deployed in days, not months. For some companies, this might seem like a pipe dream, given traditional mega vendors’ notoriously long wait times and fees. The reality, though, is that we’re moving toward a model with more consumer-friendly, cloud-based software products that are designed to be this flexible. If your software vendor’s response to critical requests is consistently, “Hey, sure, we’ll get that to you in six to eight months,” then you’re just not going to see the results you need. On the other hand, if your critical request is, “This button is supposed to be yellow,” you’re doing it wrong.


It’s Scalable


Particularly with cloud and SaaS (software as a service) products, the need to scale can be huge. This isn’t quite the same as scaling, say, Twitter — your enterprise app isn’t going to debut at SXSW and get swamped by unexpected traffic spikes. It’s more about scaling to the functional demands of the business.

How easily can you scale up an implementation from an initial trial department to a global deployment? What if your company merges with a major enterprise or acquires a whole new division?  Or, on the flip side, what if you spin off a subsidiary? Your business software will need to adjust to more or fewer users, use cases and associated traffic.

Many businesses merge or acquire to rapidly grow. Your technology needs to be able to support that business growth and help accelerate it, ideally without turning it into a year-long consulting project.


These four traits are the hallmarks of better business software, but they can be tough to discern in an avalanche of demos.  If these resonate with you, how do they apply (or not apply) to the technology you’re running across your company today? What processes or software could use a rethink?

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, shironosov

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Already using Google+? Follow Mashable’s Pete Cashmore for the latest about the platform’s new features, tips and tricks as well as social media and technology updates.

Now that you’ve had a few weeks to get your feet wet with Google+, it’s time to make sure your other web properties are linking to your +Profile in style.

SEE ALSO: Google+ Tips & Tricks: 10 Hints for New Users

As always, the web is teeming with talented and generous artists who offer their visions of a more beautiful Internet up for free. We’ve sampled their wares and chosen the classiest badges and buttons that will alert your readers in no uncertain terms: “Hey, I’m doing things on the Google+!”

Found any beauties we missed? Link away in the comments.

1. The Google+ App, by David Walsh

Probably the defining Google+ icon on the web right now, the subtle gradients and light shadow give David Walsh’s contribution the look of a smooth stone. It’ll make a nice addition to any webpage or app dock.

2. A Google Rainbow, by Samuel McQueen

What it lacks in texture, it makes up for with a fresh take on Google’s color scheme.

3. A Clean Vector, via Sean McCabe

Here’s the original inspiration for Walsh’s, created by designer Sean McCabe. This option includes the big plus.

4. A Bit of Texture, via Creative Nerds

This four-pack comes with and without grain.

4. Assorted +1 Items, via IconShock

At first glance, this pack may seem similar to those previously discussed. But the bevel of light that runs across each one adds a glossier feel. What’s more, the set comes with the white versions, as well as their non-glossy counterparts.

7. Circular With a Waving Banner, by Taiyab Raja

This little number makes thematic use the Google+ “circles,” and adds the logo colors with a waving banner. It’s a great choice for an airy blog theme.

Mashable clouds sold separately.

8. A Touch of Glass, via Serif Tuts

We really like these. View them at full size for maximum appreciation.

9. Inverted Metal, via The Icon Deposit

In a word: epic.

10. A +Fresh Font, by David Silva

Silva freshens up the Google logo with a new font — great for design-centric sites. It’s based on Sean McCabe’s original vector.

More About: design, Google, Google Plus, icons, List, Lists, Social Media, social media icons, web design

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In the same way that bar codes don’t have to be boring, quick response codes can also be creative. Thanks to a 30% tolerance in readability, you can have some real fun with clever designs. Besides looking good, this can also make them more successful.

“Designer QR codes are not only a way to make your 2D barcode stand out, but they also add a more human element to the otherwise cold and techie appearance,” says Patrick Donnelly, QR code designer and expert. “This could be the difference between someone scanning your code or not.”

Take a look through the image gallery for 15 brilliant designs created for a range of businesses from big names such as Disney, little names such as local restaurants and even conceptual ideas. Let us know in the comments if a clever design would make you more likely to scan a code.

1. Ayara Thai Cuisine




Designed by Paperlinks, a charming elephant drawing adds a dash of Asia to this LA restaurant’s QR code.

2. True Blood

HBO’s True Blood season 3 was the first TV series to get a designer QR code in an ad, thanks to a collaboration between Warbasse Design, .phd agency and SET Japan.

3. Magic Hat Brewing Company

This clever code from Patrick Donnelly is made up of bottle tops and links to the beer company’s mobile optimized Facebook page.

4. Help Japan Now

Chances are you’ve already seen SET’s “Help Japan” design. As well as extending the code to make an instantly recognizable red cross, the faux parts of the code contain related symbols for an arresting overall effect.

5. Louis Vuitton

Another SET creation, QR codes get playful with a dose of Takeshi Murakami-influenced design for Louis Vuitton’s mobile website

.

6. Corkbin

Cliffano Subagio spotted these awesome Disney codes in Japan where QR is a well established marketing tool.

8. Discover LA Tourism Bureau

This Paperlinks code is both cool and calm with made-you-look palm trees that add a special design touch.

9. Pac-Man

An experimental design from Patrick Donnelly, we love the witty, retro appeal.

10. Greenfield Lodge

The dots from Greenfield Lodge’s floral logo are replicated throughout the design to great effect.

11. M&Ms

Anther concept design from Patrick Donnelly, we like the idea of arranging real-life objects into a scannable code.

12. The Fillmore Silver Spring

Paperlinks added musical instruments into this concert venue’s design, a neat way to tease consumers into reading the code.

13. Burtonwood & Holmes

Artists Tom Burtonwood and Holly Holmes have fun by extruding the classic code design with a code-within-a-code concept.

14. The Wine Sisterhood

As well as integrating elements from the group’s logo, we like how Paperlinks made the design appear painted with wine.

15. TIME

Patrick Donnelly is such a QR code enthusiast, he spent months on Farmville “growing” a design!


More About: barcodes, design, gallery, List, Lists, MARKETING, QR Codes, trending

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Posters are a great way to cheer up your work space, whether your home office, the walls of your cubicle or even your swanky corner suite.

We’ve got a great selection of geeky posters and prints from classic Apple advertising to curious Android typographical illustrations.

Take a look through the image gallery, click through on the blue title text for more info on each image, and let us know in the comments which posters you’d pick for your office.

1. xkcd Map of Online Communities




xkcd’s “Map of Online Communities” is a fascinating snapshot of 2010’s web world.

Cost: $15

2. eBoy Cities Posters

We’re big fans of the eBoy group’s pixel art. They’ve created a whole collectible series of city posters that includes North American locations as well as London, Paris, Tokyo and Berlin.

Cost: $27

3. Periodic Table of Typefaces

The “Periodic Table of Typefaces” is a witty take on font classification. Also available: “So You Need a Typeface” flowchart and “Typefaces of the World.”

Cost: From $16

4. VectorSetPosters

As well as digital tools for designers, these VectorSets are available as prints. With tons of different sets, you could create a really striking grouping.

Cost: From $24.49

5. Andy Versus

One of a set of Android-themed illustrations, this poster depicts a little green bot fending off attack from a rather familiar figure…

Cost: $15

6. Nintendo Evolution

This simple Etsy print would be a great pic for a Nintendo fan.

Cost: From $8.50

7. Susan Kare Apple Prints

Former Apple designer Susan Kare offers limited edition prints of her classic icons.

Cost: From $89

8. The Oatmeal Grammar Pack

The Oatmeal’s “Grammar Pack” includes four great comics: “how to use an apostrophe,” “how to use a semicolon,” “10 words you need to stop misspelling,” and “when to use i.e. in a sentence.” We can’t think of a better set of rules to stick on your wall, especially if you work with words.

Cost: $32

9. Retro Videogame Propaganda Posters

Frogger, Dig Dug, Tron, Joust, Donkey Kong all get propaganda posters in this rad, retro set.

Cost: $49.99

10. Typography Deconstructed

More fun for font fans, this gorgeous graphic deconstructs typography, and would look great in your design department.

Cost: From $35

11. Fail Whale

If you’re a fan of Yiying Lu’s “Fail Whale,” then this three-foot wide version should bring a smile to your face.

Cost: $49.99

12. eBoy FooBar Poster

Grab a slice of web history with this now classic depiction of Web 2.0 circa 2006. It’ll be a collector’s item one day…

Cost: $27

13. Google Doodles

Everyone loves Google Doodles. Sadly, Google’s online store offers just seven designs in print. Collect the lot and hope for more in the near future.

Cost: From $4.75 each

14. Evolution of the Geek

Flowtown had a hit with its great “Evolution of the Geek” infographic. Now you can buy the poster version.

Cost: $19.99

15. Typographic Maps

There’s a whole set of typography-themed maps that accurately depict the features of major U.S. cities using nothing but type.

Cost: From $30

16. Susan Kare Facebook Prints

As well as Apple-themed prints, some of Kare’s contemporary Facebook icons are also available as limited edition prints.

Cost: From $89

17. Visual Aid Posters

We adore Visual Aid’s huge collection of geeky prints. They offer graphical explanations of a huge range of topics including color theory, types of hats, The Beatles vs The Rolling Stones, table settings, flight times and much, much more.

Cost: From £4 (approx $6.50)

18. Mac Reference Posters

This excellent Etsy poster offers you a field guide to Mac trackpad gestures. Also available is an OS X button legend and a quick reference for shortcuts.

Cost: $20

19. Why Working at Home is Both Awesome and Horrible

More from The Oatmeal with this hilarious comic that explains why working at home is both awesome and horrible. It’s an absolute must for any telecommuter.

Cost: $11.95

20. iA Web Trend Map

iA has mapped the 140 most influential people on Twitter, when they started tweeting and what they first said. Fascinating.

Cost: $59.50

21. Apple’s “Think Different” Posters

Finally, you can still get hold of Apple’s iconic “Think Different” posters on sites like eBay. Some are more rare than others, but just imagine how great the whole set would look framed on your office wall.

Cost: Varies

More About: accessories, android, apple, art, gallery, geek, Google, infographics, List, office, office accessories, posters, typography

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“Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit … “

If that’s all Greek to you, then don’t worry, it’s supposed to be. Taken from Cicero’s De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum, then altered to make zero sense, “Lorem Ipsum” is the most commonly used dummy text in the design field.

However, if you’re fed up seeing the faux Latin nonsense, we’ve found more than 30 placeholder text generators that offer something a little different — from cult movie references to classic novels to bacon. Mmmmm, bacon.

Take a look through the gallery below to discover some fun options next time you’re greeking. Let us know in the comments about any we’ve missed that you like to use.

1. Fillerati




Although different, Cameron Creative’s online tools offer a few useful options. Cut and paste a block of binary code that appears like a realistic “terms and conditions” text, should you need to fill up such a section on a website.

3. Bacon Ipsum

Pig out with graphs composed of “all meat” or “meat and filler” text.

4. Malevole Text Generator

A bizarre and random mix of TV show theme lyrics make up the filler text generated by this Malevole option.

5. Greeking Machine

The Greeking Machine offers a range of dummy text. In addition to classical Latin, languages include hillbilly, marketing, The Matrix, Metropolitan, pseudo German and our fave — techno babble.

6. Gangsta Lorem Ipsum

A block of “gangsta” text for when your design needs some extra shizzle, innit.

7. The Postmodernism Generator

If you need an essay-type format, then the Postmodernism generator has you covered with several essays of plausible-looking post-modernist nonsense.

8. Vegan Ipsum

If Bacon Ipsum is just too meaty for you, the same team offers a vegan version. Generate one to five graphs of veggie text. And, if you’re really gung-ho for going green, there’s also Veggie Ipsum to check out too.

9. Blind Text Generator

Alongside more traditional placeholder texts, the Blind Text Generator will spice things up for you with “Kafka,” “Werther,” “Pangram” and more.

10. Fillerama

We’ve bonus-ified this offering as it’s a little unusual, but could be just the ticket for certain projects. Adhesion Text creates words based on the letters you enter.

More About: design, dummy text, gallery, List, Lists, lorem ipsum, text generators

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If your favorite part of July 4 celebrations is the fireworks, then we’ve got a fun gallery for you. We’ve found five tools that offer virtual fireworks you can enjoy right at your desk.

Whether you want to send someone an animated message, play around to create a mesmerizing browser show or add fireworks to your own site, we’ve found web sparklers to suit.

Light the touchpaper, stand at a safe distance and rocket through the gallery. You can find out more about the tools by clicking on the blue title text at the top left of each slide. Let us know which ones you like in the comments below.

1. Enjoy Canvas Fireworks




This hypnotic HTML5 Canvas experiment offers three different shapes of fireworks that you can control with your mouse for a 3D wow experience.

2. Write a Message in Fireworks

This is tons of fun. Compose your own message and see it written across the London skyline in fireworks. You can also share it with an automatically generated tiny URL.

3. Add Fireworks to Your Own Site With Fireworks.js

You can add fireworks to your own site with this nifty Javascript animation experiment. Or if you’re just firecracker-curious, you can play around with it on the dev’s site.

4. View Augmented Reality Fireworks

Simply print off the marker, fire up your webcam and you can enjoy your very own miniature augmented reality fireworks show.

5. Go Old School With Fireworks Just For You

Dating back to 2002, this particular desktop show is perfect for kids, offering mesmerizing fireworks generated by the click of your mouse.

BONUS: Join the HTML5 Fireworks Festival

If you’re handy with HTML5 then join the “Hanabi fireworks festival” by forking the sample code, or creating your own from scratch. The resulting entries will then be revealed as an online spectacular on July 7.

More About: apps, fireworks, HTML5, july 4, List, Lists, software, web apps

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As browsers and server-side platforms advance, and libraries new and old grow and mature, JavaScript evolves as well. Staying at the top of your game is important. As a JavaScript developer, you’ll need to keep up with the latest news and learn new skills.

We’ve put together a list of seven of our favorite JavaScript resources to help save you time and energy along the way. Whether you’re a beginner or a seasoned pro, we think you’ll find the sites below both informative and beneficial. If you know of other great resources, feel free to share them in the comments.

1. Mozilla Developer Network

The MDN has become the de facto resource for JavaScript documentation, and is an excellent resource for beginners and seasoned developers alike. Here you’ll find the official and complete JavaScript reference, as well as useful guides, tutorials and articles covering everything from the basics of how JavaScript works to its best practices and design patterns. The MDN also has a thorough DOM reference, which we highly recommend checking out as well.

2. JQAPI

JS Fiddle is a JavaScript pastebin on steroids. Create, share, execute and test your JavaScript right in the browser. This is a great tool for collaborative debugging or for sharing code snippets. It’s also a fun way to perform quick experiments and test out new ideas. Simply combine your JavaScript, HTML and CSS, then click the “Run” button to see the results. You can also validate your JavaScript code against JSLint and save your Fiddle for use later, or share with others. JS Fiddle provides a number of useful features, like the ability to load up common frameworks automatically (to test your jQuery or MooTools code, for example) and as-you-type syntax highlighting, just like you’d get by writing code in your favorite IDE.

4. Eloquent JavaScript

This free ebook is an introduction to programming and the JavaScript language, written by developer and tech writer Marjin Haverbeke. The book reads much like a tutorial, and introduces a number of concepts and real-world applications in a clean, concise style. Interactive examples are also available, which means you can read about various techniques. You’ll also get a chance to see them in action, and tinker with the code yourself. We found a lot of positive reviews for this book, so if you’re new to JavaScript, this is definitely a book worth checking out.

5. Douglas Crockford’s JavaScript Videos

An undisputed expert in JavaScript, Douglas Crockford is Yahoo’s JavaScript architect and is one of the individuals instrumental in the planning, development and future growth of the language. The videos and transcripts on the YUI blog derive from a series of talks given by Mr. Crockford about the history of JavaScript, its future and its use today. Though the series is now about a year and a half old, we still think you’ll find the videos informative. We certainly recommend watching them for a better understanding of the language, where it’s been, how it works and where it’s going.

6. How To Node

Not all JavaScript development takes place in the browser. NodeJS is one of the web’s most popular server-side JavaScript frameworks. Whether you’re a seasoned Node developer or someone who’s looking to add server-side JavaScript to his repertoire, How To Node offers a great collection of articles on NodeJS development. This community-driven site offers an excellent repository of Node tutorials that’s proven itself useful on a number of occasions. No Node developer toolkit would be complete without it.

7. DailyJS

Mac, iPhone and iPad