That app you use to play Words with Friends on your phone or book a reservation using Open Table might be giving the American economy a nice boost, at least according to a new survey by TechNet.

The new “app economy” has created about 466,000 jobs in the United States since 2007, according to the survey.

“America’s App Economy – which had zero jobs just 5 years ago before the iPhone was introduced – demonstrates that we can quickly create economic value and jobs through cutting-edge innovation,” Rey Ramsey, President and CEO of TechNet, said on the company’s blog. “Today, the App Economy is creating jobs in every part of America, employing hundreds of thousands of U.S. workers today and even more in the years to come.”

California took the lion’s share of growth with 23.8% of app-related jobs. The New York-Northern New Jersey- Long Island area tops the regional list with 9.2% of app-sparked growth.

Programmers, user interface designers, tech marketers and support staff can rejoice — all of these positions are impacted by the growing use of apps.

The survey was funded by TechNet, a bipartisan organization with a stated goal to vigorously promote technology, and Dr. Michael Mandel of South Mountain Economics LLC.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics does not have the title “mobile app developer” yet, but other IT positions are projected to see major growth in the next six years. “Computer software engineers, applications” is a term used to describe a sector of jobs that is expected to grow 34% from 2008-2018.

As mobile devices and the cloud help to expand the business of apps, it wouldn’t be a surprise for that number to jump even more.

Have you been impacted by the “app economy”? How? Tell us in the comments.

More About: android, application, apps, economy, iphone, jobs

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hacker image

How is this for a gauge of how desperately technology companies are seeking programmers? Over the weekend, any coder can audition for jobs at companies such as Facebook, Amazon, Groupon and Apple simultaneously — without changing out of their pajamas.

Programmer database startup Interviewstreet is hosting an online coding challenge called CodeSprint beginning Friday, and 75 technology companies will be looking for employment candidates on its leaderboard.

Coders who sign up for the challenge will receive an email on Friday evening when a set of programming problems becomes available. As they solve problems throughout the weekend, they will earn points and can see how they stack up against other participants. After the challenge ends on Sunday night, the participating companies will have the opportunity to contact specific candidates for job interviews based on their performance.

Questions will include basic programming challenges as well as real-world problems. A practice problem in the latter category, for instance, asks users to create a program that finds what time of day any Twitter user tweets most often. Some companies, including Groupon, have created problems that are relevant to their own engineering challenges. In all cases, better code that works faster will earn more points.

This is the second time that Interviewstreet has hosted a coding challenge. The first event, in October, only admitted students at select universities, resulting in 140 job interviews. This upcoming challenge will allow anyone with Internet access to participate.

Interviewstreet is not conducting virtual employment hackathons out of sympathy for unemployed computer scientists (of which there are few). Coding challenges are core to its business, which catalogs programmers based on skills they have proved themselves in. When an employer hires a coder it finds on the site, or through a CodeSprint challenge, they pay the startup $10,000.

Are you participating in the CodeSprint challenge? Let us know in the comments below.

More About: amazon, apple, CodeSprint, Facebook, Interviewstreet, jobs

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This post originally appeared on the American Express OPEN Forum, where Mashable regularly contributes articles about leveraging social media and technology in small business.

As a freelancer or job seeker, it is important to have a resume that stands out among the rest — one of the more visually pleasing options on the market today is the infographic resume.

An infographic resume enables a job seeker to better visualize his or her career history, education and skills.

Unfortunately, not everyone is a graphic designer, and whipping up a professional-looking infographic resume can be a difficult task for the technically unskilled job seeker. For those of us not talented in design, it can also be costly to hire an experienced designer to toil over a career-centric infographic.

Luckily, a number of companies are picking up on this growing trend and building apps to enable the average job seeker to create a beautiful resume.

To spruce up your resume, check out these four tools for creating an infographic CV. If you’ve seen other tools on the market, let us know about them in the comments below.


1. Vizualize.me


Vizualize.me is a new app that turns a user’s LinkedIn profile information into a beautiful, web-based infographic.

After creating an account and connecting via LinkedIn, a user can edit his or her profile summary, work experience, education, links, skills, interests, languages, stats, recommendations and awards. And voila, a stunning infographic is created.

The company’s vision is to “be the future of resumes.” Lofty goal, but completely viable, given that its iteration of the resume is much more compelling than the simple, black-and-white paper version that currently rules the world.


2. Re.vu


Re.vu, a newer name on the market, is another app that enables a user to pull in and edit his or her LinkedIn data to produce a stylish web-based infographic.

The infographic layout focuses on the user’s name, title, biography, social links and career timeline — it also enables a user to add more graphics, including stats, skill evolution, proficiencies, quotes and interests over time.

Besides the career timeline that is fully generated via the LinkedIn connection, the other graphics can be a bit tedious to create, as all of the details must be entered manually.

In the end, though, a very attractive infographic resume emerges. This is, by far, the most visually pleasing option of all of the apps we reviewed.


3. Kinzaa


Based on a user’s imported LinkedIn data, Kinzaa creates a data-driven infographic resume that focuses on a user’s skills and job responsibilities throughout his or her work history.

The tool is still in beta, so it can be a bit wonky at times — but if you’re looking for a tool that helps outline exactly how you’ve divided your time in previous positions, this may be your tool of choice.

Unlike other tools, it also features a section outlining the user’s personality and work environment preferences. Details such as preferences on company size, job security, challenge level, culture, decision-making speed and more are outlined in the personality section, while the work environment section focuses on the user’s work-day length, team size, noise level, dress code and travel preferences.


4. Brazen Careerist Facebook App


Brazen Careerist, the career management resource for young professionals, launched a new Facebook application in September that generates an infographic resume from a user’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn information.

After a user authorizes the app to access his or her Facebook and LinkedIn data, the app creates an infographic resume with a unique URL — for example, my infographic resume is located at brazen.me/u/ericaswallow.

The infographic features a user’s honors, years of experience, recommendations, network reach, degree information, specialty keywords, career timeline, social links and LinkedIn profile image.

The app also creates a “Career Portfolio” section which features badges awarded based on a user’s Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn achievements. Upon signing up for the app, I earned eight badges, including “social media ninja,” “team player” and “CEO in training.” While badges are a nice addition, they aren’t compelling enough to keep me coming back to the app.


Your Thoughts


Have you used a web app to create an infographic resume? If so, which tool did you use and how was your experience? Let us know in the comments below.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, SchulteProductions

More About: features, infographic, jobs, mashable, resumes

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Brian Casel is the co-creator of Skipper, the Team Relationship Management system designed to help distributed teams grow and scale their business. Connect with Brian on Twitter @CasJam.

Across the world, but particularly within the web design industry, the distributed agency model has gained widespread popularity. Centered on the idea of working remotely, more businesses are adopting the distributed agency model as a practical and beneficial alternative to keeping an in-house staff.

The distributed agency model, or “virtual agency,” as it’s sometimes called, is simply an agency that hires and collaborates with workers remotely. The team might be made up of full or part-time employees, freelancers, contractors, partners, etc. These employees might be spread across a particular city or over the entire world. In short, a distributed team is location-agnostic.

nGen Works recently closed its main office when it became apparent that the majority of its team lived and worked miles away. Founder Carl Smith wrote in the company’s blog:

“When we first started nGen Works we knew we ‘had’ to have an office for people to take us seriously … Because of our flexible nature and the requirement for nGeneers to live their lives on their terms, that old red beauty is only home to two of the 14 people currently working with nGen. We’ve held on to it for sentimental reasons, but now it just doesn’t seem to make sense.”

Then there’s Shane and Peter, an agency team of independent freelancers. Its website explains:

“Our team is comprised of freelancers all over North America (with a couple Europeans and Australians thrown in for good measure). They’re all independent business owners, and they’re all brilliant at what they do. They decide when and how they work. Our teams come together to tackle projects that are far larger than they could tackle on their own.”


Motivations Behind Going Distributed


Both large firms and small shops are embracing agency distribution for different reasons.

Large firms see hiring remote workers as a way to save on overhead costs and maintain a healthy bottom line. Also, the distributed model helps them stay competitive by recruiting specialized talent that is not necessarily local.

On the other hand, small shops and freelancers see the distributed agency model as a viable path to scale up and grow their business without investing too much or incurring debt. For a solo studio owner looking to grow, it’s more practical to partner with or hire remote workers than to invest in an in-house staff.


Benefits of Being Distributed


While every shop operates differently, there are a few key benefits shared by distributed agencies.

  • Low Overhead: Your business will save loads of overhead costs when it doesn’t need to pay for a large office stocked with equipment, utilities, commuting costs and more.
  • Unlimited Talent Pool: When you’re able to look for talent beyond your local area, you have access to virtually unlimited resources.
  • Happier, More Productive Team: When workers, particularly independent freelancers, are able to work their own hours, using their own equipment, without having to conform to an office environment and schedule, it can lead to a more productive operation.

Based on my own experience running a small distributed agency, I believe one very important benefit of this model is the people.

A distributed agency will have success with a certain type of worker — one who thrives in a remote collaboration setting. Remote workers are inherently self-motivated by their passion for creating outstanding work. Plus, they’re incredibly effective at communication and collaboration over long distances. Of course, not everyone is cut out for this, but you can certainly find enough remote work rockstars when you can choose from a worldwide talent pool.


How To Make it Work


The first step is to re-think meetings.

As many of us know, meetings are a common complaint of working in a large office environment. Often, they can be more of a sap on time than a benefit. The conversations had in these meetings can actually (and more effectively) be handled over a series of emails or chats. Jason Fried describes this concept as “Slow Time:”

“Slow time is ‘Maybe it takes two or three days to have this conversation. And we do it over periods of 15 minutes here, two minutes there, four minutes there.’ And that’s fine. It doesn’t need to happen all at once.“

Focus on team relationship management.

When your team is distributed across several time zones and, therefore, is not in direct contact at all times, it’s important to develop systems that tie everything together. Everything from networking with new talent across the globe, to developing working and friendly relationships all require extra effort in the distributed agency setting.

It might mean you plan in-person team get-togethers once or twice a year to build friendships and experiences that strengthen camaraderie.

Think about staying tuned into and engaged with the social media activity of your teammates, both in and outside of work.

Remain accountable at all times.

This goes for both managers and workers within a distributed agency. Everyone must go the extra mile to ensure that he’s staying available, providing updates and meeting deadlines. That means checking in with teammates to ensure they have everything they need from you. It means providing periodic updates on your progress — even if you haven’t completed a task.

Organization, accountability and personal interaction provide the pillars of a successfully run distributed agency model. Does your business qualify?

Images courtesy of Flickr, Giorgio Montersino, ianus

More About: Business, contributor, features, jobs, management, remote worker

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If you’re seeking a job in social media, we’d like to help out. For starters, Mashable‘s Job Lists section gathers together all of our resource lists, how-tos and expert guides to help you get hired. In particular, you might want to see our articles on How to Leverage Social Media for Career Success and How to Find a Job on Twitter.

But we’d like to help in a more direct way, too. Mashable‘s job boards are a place for socially savvy companies to find people like you. This week and every week, Mashable features its coveted job board listings for a variety of positions in the web, social media space and beyond. Have a look at what’s good and new on our job boards:


Mashable Job Postings


Community Intern at Mashable in New York, NY.


Graphic Design Intern at Mashable in New York, NY.


Editorial Intern at Mashable in New York, NY.


Tech Reporter at Mashable in San Francisco, CA.


Editorial Assistant at Mashable in New York, NY.


Mashable Job Board Listings


Multi-Channel Merchandising Assistant at The National 4-H Council in Chevy Chase, MD.


Social Media Manager at LivingSocial in Washington, D.C.


Interactive Producer/ Daring Truth Seeker at SANBORN MEDIA FACTORY in New York, NY.


Digital Marketing Designer/Editor at xMatters, Inc. in Dublin, CA.


SEO Manager at Leading Online News Destination in Los Angeles, CA.


Senior Web Developer (Ruby on Rails) at Memory Reel in Dallas, TX.


Director, Product Marketing at New Relic in San Francisco, CA.


Jr. Interactive Digital Artist at CP+B in Boulder, CO.


Social Media Officer at Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington, D.C.


ColdFusion Application Developer at Fusionapps in Secaucus, NJ.


Associate SEO Strategist at Morpheus Media in New York, NY.


Interactive Savvy Graphic Designer/Art Director at Bill Young Productions Inc. in Houston, TX.


Paid Online Innovation Internships with MoveOn Labs at MoveOn.org in Berkeley, CA.


Developer Advocate at Atlassian in San Francisco, CA.


Online Communications Manager – South Asia Region at The World Bank in Washington, D.C.


Email Marketing Manager at Inman News in Alameda, CA.


Content and Community Development Manager at Loehmann’s in Bronx, NY.


Product Manager – Local Business Products at Yelp Inc. in San Francisco, CA.


Associate Digital Producer (emphasis on social media and gaming) at roundhouse in Seattle, WA.


Mashable‘s Job Board has a variety of web 2.0, application development, business development and social networking job opportunities available. Check them out here.

Find a Web 2.0 Job with Mashable

Got a job posting to share with our readers? Post a job to Mashable today ($99 for a 30 day listing) and get it highlighted every week on Mashable.com (in addition to exposure all day every day in the Mashable marketplace).

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, YinYang

More About: COMMUNICATIONS, design, jobs, List, Social Media


Dan Dao is a Reporter at Fueled, an iPhone & Android app development agency based in New York City, where he writes about the tech industry. You can follow him on Twitter @da0_o and read the blog on Fueled.

Employers who hire designers are often not designers themselves. That reality can cause a disconnect between what designers display in their portfolios and what employers are actually looking for.

If you’re curious about the types of design portfolios that shine at job interviews, why not learn from the employers who loved them? Below, three employers share useful tips about maximizing the appeal of your online portfolio.

1. Choose the Right Hosting




Make sure you choose the right hosting and content management system (CMS) to feature your work. Whether you’ve built your own website or plan to use a portfolio service (like Carbonmade above), make sure your site will translate identically across all web browsers (Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc.).

Image courtesy of Veronica Pisano

2. Simple, but Professional Presentation

The goal of your portfolio is to make your work accessible. Fancy, animated designs may look interesting, but they can distract from the actual work you’re attempting to showcase. Simplicity will translate as professionalism more often than fancy, overdone graphics. As far as aesthetic and visual presentation, keep it simple and neat, and let the work speak for itself.

  • David Lifson, CEO of Postling: “Oftentimes, designers will have brochure websites, and I find that those are not helpful. I look for data-dense examples, something where there’s more usability than visual design. That’s what I would say highly functional websites are built on.”

  • Merill Stubbs and Amanda Hesser, co-founders of Food52: “Whatever you’re shown, whether it be a website or a specific presentation…[it] should be very professional.”

  • Carter Cleveland, CEO of Art.sy: “Although it is an opportunity to show your chops and do something fancy, I’ve seen more examples of people failing to pull it off…I’ve seen more ‘fancy’ websites done badly than done well.”

Image courtesy of Alastaire Allday

3. Make it User-Friendly

Stubbs and Hesser warn that although employers may like a designer’s visual work, the designer “might not understand the user experience implications of their designs.” By making your design portfolio user-friendly, you’re displaying an understanding of navigability and user experience. If your portfolio is user-friendly, chances are the product you design will be user-friendly as well.

Start by reducing the number of clicks and links, as well as the amount of scrolling needed to access all of your content, suggests Cleveland.

Image courtesy of We Are Sofa

4. Know Your Audience

Determine the specific skills your potential employers are looking for. For instance, bonus expertise in product management, web development (HTML, Javascript, and CSS) or marketing adds bonus points to the portfolio of a clearly talented designer.

Each employer will have different hiring needs, and you need to adapt accordingly. Food52’s Hesser and Stubbs needed a designer with experience in building social sites due to the strong social aspect of the company, while Lifson and Cleveland were looking for someone with experience in product management as well as design. Smaller companies in particular will seek designers with versatile experience, which can include knowledge of different programs like Photoshop and Fireworks.

Seen above, designer Jordan Fretz provides a full list of tools with which he is familiar alongside a detailed description of his background.

Image courtesy of Jordan Fretz

5. Have a Varied Portfolio

Hesser and Stubbs say, “A portfolio that is varied is important so you can work with as many different types of clients as possible.” Food52’s designer Camillia Benbassat features works in her portfolio that use different types of media. Dragging your mouse over each photo in her showcase reveals the name of the company, the type of media, and a few essential details about the project. Each is clearly labeled and categorized, whether by web design, mobile app, user experience, identity, print or packaging.

Image courtesy of Camillia BenBassat

6. Be Organized

While including many examples is a plus, you still need to clearly sort and organize your work in the porfolio. On Elliot Jay Stocks’ website, the top header showcases featured work, but the remainder of the showcase is organized by client and project type.

Image courtesy of Elliot Jay Stocks

7. Be Accessible

Your contact information should be the easiest thing to find on your site. Include multiple forms of contact, if possible. Designer Jared Christensen nicely presents his LinkedIn profile next to his resume, in addition to other social networking sites under his About Me page.

Image courtesy of Jareditigal

8. Keep it Current

Frequently updated portfolios show that you take enough pride in your work to actively produce more. Even if your portfolio contains a few unfinished projects, provide samples alongside a “work in progress” note, as designer Matt Bango does on his portfolio.

Image courtesy of Matt Bango’s Portfolio

9. Credibility

It’s important to build and maintain credibility. This means you should be able to reproduce and tweak everything in your portfolio. Part of Postling’s hiring process involves contracting the applicant to complete a small (paid) work assignment. “I want to see that [the designers] can actually produce what their portfolio says they can produce,” Lifson says, “because you never know if sometimes they get some help.”

Hesser and Stubbs look more at past experience. They believe a designer’s former employment indicates whether she is accustomed to deadlines and memos, and maintains a level of professionalism.

Cleveland also looks for what he calls “social proof,” in other words, past work credentials or testimonials. Providing links to these things on your site makes it easier for the employer to get an immediate sense of your professionalism.

Image courtesy of Jamie Kim

10. Share Your Portfolio

Once you’ve created a stunning portfolio, share and advertise across multiple platforms. Postling says designers need to “get their work out in the open, whether on Forrst, Dribbble or Tumblr. Provide links to your portfolio from various social networking sites such as Facebook and LinkedIn, as well as in the signature of your work email. You’ll get more views of your showcase, which can lead to more interviews.

Image courtesy of Postling

More About: design, jobs, MARKETING, web design

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Everyone loves a bad-guy-gone-good story, and these black hat hackers who went from lives of crime to corporate nine-to-fives epitomize that genre.

Let’s first make an important distinction: Hackers are not criminals. In fact, “hacker” is a term of high praise in the developer community. But when a hacker is dubbed a “black hat,” it means he or she has broken laws in the pursuit of hacking — perhaps even that he or she has done so for personal gain.

However, many black hat hackers have gone legit in their more mature years. While it’s not uncommon to see former cybercriminals switching teams to work as IT security consultants, many of the more high-profile black hat hackers also find themselves writing books, doing journalism and even getting public speaking gigs in the cybersecurity world.

So with that understanding, let’s turn our gaze upon these seven fascinating personalities who once hacked indiscriminately and are now employed respectably — some of them even by the companies they once hacked.

Ashley Towns

Towns created the first-ever iPhone worm, a rickrolling bit of code that only affected jailbroken iPhones. Mere weeks after the worm started spreading, Towns was hired by mogeneration, a company that develops iPhone apps, mostly for other clients such as TrueLocal, FoodWatch and Xumii.

Call of Duty Hacker

A 14-year-old Dublin schoolboy hacked into the Microsoft Xbox system this spring. In stark contrast to how Sony handled PlayStation hackers like geohot, Microsoft decided to work with the kid instead. The company hopes to teach the indubitably talented hacker to “use his skills for legitimate purposes.”

Christopher Tarnovsky

Hardware hacker Christopher Tarnovsky began his journey repairing satellites for the U.S. Army. He started dabbling in illegal hacking in the late 1990s. However, he didn’t get into serious legal trouble until he was hired by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. to hack a rival company’s satellite TV chip. These days, Tarnovsky runs a hardware security firm and sticks to gray hat hacking, like proving Infineon’s “unhackable” chip was anything but in 2010.

Jeff Moss

Moss is the founder of the Black Hat and DEF CON computer hacker conferences. In the days before the Internet was a big thing, he ran BBSes for hacking and phreaking and provided a hub for a huge, underground network of hackers of all stripes, from the curious to the criminal. In 2009, he was was sworn into the U.S. Homeland Security Advisory Council. And in April 2011, Moss was named chief security officer for ICANN, the agency that oversees the Internet’s domain names.

Michael Mooney

Mooney is best known for creating the Twitter bug Mikeyy, a worm designed to showcase Twitter’s security vulnerabilities. While the exploit was more gray than black hat, the worm could have gotten Mooney into serious legal trouble. However, Twitter didn’t press charges, and the 17-year-old Mooney was offered jobs by two software development firms. The teen accepted a position at web app shop exqSoft Solutions.

Owen Thor Walker

Also known as “akill,” Walker was charged as (and admitted to) being the ringleader of an international hacking group that caused nearly $26 million of damage. In 2008 he was hired by TelstraClear, the New Zealand subsidiary of Australian telecommunications company Telstra, to work with its security division, DMZGlobal.

Robert Tappan Morris

Morris is best known for creating the first Internet worm, the Morris Worm, in 1988. Later, he co-founded an online store, Viaweb, with Paul Graham, who would later found startup incubator Y Combinator. Viaweb was one of the first web-based computer applications. Now, Morris teaches computer science at MIT.


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More Dev & Design Resources from Mashable:


How the WordPress SEO Plugin Can Help Your Blog [INTERVIEW]
Closed or Open Source: Which CMS is Right for Your Business?
A Look Back at Eight Years of WordPress
HOW TO: Get Started with the Less Framework
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image credits: iStockphoto, airportrait, Flickr/pikturz, Wikipedia, Wired, Flickr/ICANN

More About: black hat, career, developers, hackers, jobs, web development series

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In today’s highly competitive job market, creating the right video resume to accompany your traditional CV can make you stand out from the crowd. The wrong one, though, can make you a laughingstock.

Getting it right can be pretty tough. If you’re considering going down the video resume route, we’ve got some advice for you from pros in the know, as well as real-life examples of great attempts from clued-in job hunters.

Take a look at our five must-read tips for creating a video resume and please let us know which examples you like (as well as any tips you’d like to share) in the comments below.


1. Make Sure It’s Appropriate


Don’t just create a video resume because you can, create one because it’s relevant to the job you want to do.

If you’re applying for a role in the online, media, social or creative professions, then it’s more likely a decent video resume will have the desired effect, i.e., getting you invited for an interview.

Don’t send a video resume to a more traditional type of company that won’t “get it.” You might do your chances more harm than good.

Graeme Anthony, from the example above, is a public relations executive. His cleverly thought out online content adds an extra wow factor to his already outstanding experience.


2. Don’t Just Read Out Your Resume


The whole point of a video presentation is to offer a potential employer greater insight into you than a traditional resume can, so just reading aloud the contents of your CV is a waste of everyone’s time.

Use the video to help the employer get a sense of not just what you have achieved, but what you are capable of achieving in the future.

“Tell them why you would be the right person to hire and what you can do for them,” says Mario Gedicke, account manager at Mayomann.com, a video employment platform.

You can, however, highlight particularly relevant info from your resume. “Focus on your experience and skill set (and possible education/training) especially relevant to the position,” advises Tyler Redford, CEO of resumebook.tv, an online resume management system.

And if it’s appropriate and relevant to the job (as in the example above), then don’t be afraid to talk about your passions.


3. Keep it Short


“Keep your video resume short,” says Gedicke, who advises that a one-minute mark is ideal. Redford agrees that a video resume should be “short and sweet.” He suggests staying within two minutes.

“Keep in mind that recruiters would likely want to use the video resume as an initial filter for applicants,” Redford says. “However, recruiters do not typically want to use the video resume in lieu of a real, in-person interview.”

Think of your video resume as your own personal teaser trailer. In the example above, the clip is less than one minute and 20 seconds in length, while the extra time is made up of a bloopers reel accompanied with credits, a clever way to show off your personality (and that you don’t take yourself too seriously).


4. Don’t Be Afraid to Be Creative


If you’re opting for a video resume, then go the whole hog and make it spectacular. Be creative, whether that’s with the concept of your pitch, use of humor, clever production values or brilliant editing.

However, stay classy. “Be creative, but professional. Do not deviate too much from the demeanor you would have in the workplace,” says Redford. Gedicke suggests this should extend to your wardrobe too: “Dress professionally, just as if you are going to an in-person interview.”

In the video above, James Corne creates a spoof AA-style confession, but maintains a certain veneer and dresses like he was headed to the office. This demonstrates creativity and humor whilst showing him to be a professional person.


5. Make Sure It Passes the Share Test


As with all online life, don’t put content out there that you wouldn’t be prepared to see go viral. It’s unlikely your video resume will become an overnight Internet sensation, but imagining that scenario is a good test to make sure you could cope if it did.

Imagine your friends and family watching the clip. If the thought of that embarrasses you, then don’t submit it.


Digital Marketing Job Listings


Every week we put out a list of social media and web job opportunities. While we post a huge range of job listings, we’ve selected some of the top digital marketing opportunities from the past two weeks to get you started. Happy hunting!


More Related Resources from Mashable


4 Digital Alternatives to the Traditional Resume
Top 9 Job Sites to Bookmark for Your Career Search
19 Resources to Help You Land a Job in 2011
5 Ways to Get a Job Through YouTube
5 Tips for Aspiring Social Media Marketers

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, oleg66

More About: career, career guidance, career hunting, careers, job search, job search series, jobs, resumes, video, video resumes

Whether you want to improve your existing skills or learn new ones, we’ve provided plenty of web design and development resources in the past year.

Here we recap the best posts that fell into this creative category. These include a wealth of tutorials, resources, galleries, interviews and more.

Have a read below for a look back at Mashable‘s Dev and Design resources from 2010, and be sure to keep coming back next year for more.


Mobile Development Resources





google phones

Whatever mobile platform(s) you favor, we’ve got you covered.


Icon Resources


From minimal to festive, here’s a roundup of great icon galleries.


Resources for Web Developers


PHP tips? Check. Apps for developers? Check. Online resources? Check.


Apple-Related Resources


The iPad made an impact on dev and design this year. Here’s why.


Photoshop Resources


Photoshop is one of the primary tools in the digital designer’s belt. We got you up and running with the imaging software in 2010.


Career Resources


Whatever career path you’re following in the online dev and design world, these articles can help.


Web Design


We’ve offered a wealth of design-related resources this year — dive in!


Interviews


From iconic designers to icon designers, we’ve talked to some rather interesting folk during the past 12 months.


Fun Resources


It’s not all work, work, work as we add a little fun with these light-hearted articles.