Appcelerator and IDC released their Q3 Mobile Developer Report on Wednesday, which looks at how mobile developers currently view the smartphone and tablet landscape. The report revealed that developers are most excited about the mobile potential of Google+ and Apple’s iCloud.

Despite it being just a month old, Google+ is showing plenty of potential, according to devs. The majority surveyed say Google+ has what it takes to compete head-on with Facebook. Meanwhile, iCloud’s mainstream potential has iOS developers enthused about the possibilities of integrating it into their apps.

Looking at the report, the one area that hasn’t changed since last spring is developer interest in the main mobile ecosystems: iOS and Android continue to be the platforms that developers are “very interested” in developing for.

There is a clear disparity between the number of developers that indicate interest in Android tablets and the relatively small number of Honeycomb-optimized apps. Scott Schwarzhoff, Appcelerator’s VP of marketing, says Android tablets are in a holding pattern. Interest is still high — based on the belief that the tablet market will mimic what we’ve seen in the mobile phone market. But tablet pricing, availability and market share are keeping many developers from taking that first step.

For the first time, Appcelerator and IDC added HTML5 to its list of platforms. Some 66% of respondents indicated that they were very interested in that format.

As we’ve seen with Twitter‘s new HTML5 iPad website, the trend of creating both native apps and HTML5 web apps — rather than choosing one or the other — remains strong.


Where’s the API?


To us, the most interesting part of the survey are the questions on social networking and cloud computing APIs.

When asked what announcement would have the biggest impact on mobile growth and adoption, near-field communication (NFC), Android patent issues and rumors of an Amazon Android tablet were all outshone by Google+ and iCloud.

Why is this compelling? Because Google+ doesn’t even have a public facing API. At the time of the survey (two weeks ago), the state of the iCloud API was still relatively limited. Ultimately, we’re not convinced that these statistics will mean a lot in terms of real-world usage, until the APIs are actually released and broadly understood.

On the social front, two-thirds of developers believe that Google+ has the potential to challenge or catch up with Facebook. Again, these numbers are compelling, but they don’t mean a whole lot until Google can back up the hype with a real, tangible API.


Easy Does It


On the cloud computing front — Amazon, the leader in the last few surveys — was essentially tied with Apple and its iCloud platform. Schwarzhoff says iCloud, unlike Amazon’s AWS, is thought to be easier for developers to implement.

Dropbox and Box.net, cloud collaboration and storage companies that have mobile APIs and are already in use by dozens of mobile apps, were not included in the survey. We think iCloud will be used by developers the same way that Box.net and Dropbox are used now, for easy access to storage and syncing tools.

Does the latest mobile survey mirror any of your thoughts and experiences with mobile app development? Let us know in the comments.

More About: appcelerator, Google Plus, icloud, mobile developer reports, stats

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The +1 button is about to get a whole lot faster, thanks to an update Google rolled out on Tuesday.

“We’ve begun to roll out out a set of changes that will make the button render up to 3x faster on your site,” software engineer David Byttow said in a blog post. “No action is required on your part, so just sit back, relax, and watch as the button loads more quickly than before.”

In addition to the speed boost, Google also introduced new code that speeds up the +1 button via an asynchronous code snippet. The code allows a web page to load with the +1 JavaScript code in parallel. The result is another improvement in page load time. The code is available on the is Google’s answer to Facebook’s Like Button. Since its launch, it has quickly gained adoption, and one report even claims its more widespread than the Twitter Tweet Button.

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Already using Google+? Follow Mashable’s Pete Cashmore for the latest about the platform’s new features, tips and tricks as well as social media and technology updates.

Now that you’ve had a few weeks to get your feet wet with Google+, it’s time to make sure your other web properties are linking to your +Profile in style.

SEE ALSO: Google+ Tips & Tricks: 10 Hints for New Users

As always, the web is teeming with talented and generous artists who offer their visions of a more beautiful Internet up for free. We’ve sampled their wares and chosen the classiest badges and buttons that will alert your readers in no uncertain terms: “Hey, I’m doing things on the Google+!”

Found any beauties we missed? Link away in the comments.

1. The Google+ App, by David Walsh

Probably the defining Google+ icon on the web right now, the subtle gradients and light shadow give David Walsh’s contribution the look of a smooth stone. It’ll make a nice addition to any webpage or app dock.

2. A Google Rainbow, by Samuel McQueen

What it lacks in texture, it makes up for with a fresh take on Google’s color scheme.

3. A Clean Vector, via Sean McCabe

Here’s the original inspiration for Walsh’s, created by designer Sean McCabe. This option includes the big plus.

4. A Bit of Texture, via Creative Nerds

This four-pack comes with and without grain.

4. Assorted +1 Items, via IconShock

If your site favors the shiny 3D, look no further than this pack of graphic trinkets.

6. A Subtle Shine, by ~abhashthapa

At first glance, this pack may seem similar to those previously discussed. But the bevel of light that runs across each one adds a glossier feel. What’s more, the set comes with the white versions, as well as their non-glossy counterparts.

7. Circular With a Waving Banner, by Taiyab Raja

This little number makes thematic use the Google+ “circles,” and adds the logo colors with a waving banner. It’s a great choice for an airy blog theme.

Mashable clouds sold separately.

8. A Touch of Glass, via Serif Tuts

We really like these. View them at full size for maximum appreciation.

9. Inverted Metal, via The Icon Deposit

In a word: epic.

10. A +Fresh Font, by David Silva

Silva freshens up the Google logo with a new font — great for design-centric sites. It’s based on Sean McCabe’s original vector.

More About: design, Google, Google Plus, icons, List, Lists, Social Media, social media icons, web design

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Already using Google+? Follow Mashable’s Pete Cashmore for the latest about the platform’s new features, tips and tricks as well as our top social media and technology updates.

This month’s hot topic has been, without a doubt, Google+. Whether the new social service from the world’s largest search company will be a “Facebook killer” remains to be seen, but one thing’s for certain: This is one social network you don’t want to ignore.

When it comes to getting found, Google+ is fast becoming a great asset for bloggers and content producers thanks to its ever-expanding user base and simple sharing tools. In this post, we’ll show you a few ways to start spreading a little of that Google+ love on your WordPress-powered website.


Display Your Google+ Profile Information


google card imageSoftware developer John Henson from PlusDevs has developed a handy, easy to use WordPress widget that displays your Google+ profile on your blog. The setup is quick and simple: Install the plug-in and drag the widget into your sidebar. Just fill out the form and you’re done.

You can also incorporate the widget into your template with only a few lines of PHP code, giving you the flexibility to place it anywhere within your layout.

You can learn more about the widget in the official blog post or jump straight to the code on GitHub.

Unofficial Google+ user tracking site SocialStatistics.com also offers an embeddable Google+ widget. Simply add your profile to their database and grab the widget code from your page on their site.


Add the +1 Button


If you’re not already using the Google +1 button, consider taking a moment to add it to your site. This is a great way to let users save, promote and find their favorite content. The +1 button only takes a few minutes to integrate with your site and works with any Google profile. While this isn’t a Google+ specific feature, we wouldn’t be at all surprised to see it integrated with the service. Either way, it’s another great way of adding an additional avenue for promotion and sharing.

You can learn more about the +1 button from Google.

To add it to your WordPress site, you can either use the official +1 button code generator from Google or take a look at the myriad +1 button WordPress plug-ins available.


Use a Google+ Inspired Theme


Do you love the look of Google+’s clean, intuitive layout and unobtrusive interface? For the die-hard fan (or, hey, maybe you run a blog that’s centered around the service), there are already a few Google+ inspired WordPress themes for your perusal.

WP Plus

wp plus image

WP Plus is a fixed-width, 3 column Google+ inspred WordPress theme supporting custom content menus, styled sticky-posts and valid XHTML/CSS code. Clean, fast-loading and SEO optimized, WP Plus gives your blog the Google+ look and feel in just minutes.

PlusOne

plus one image

Similar to WP Plus, PlusOne is another 3-column, fixed-width Google+ styled theme that supports custom WordPress menus. It’s a clean and well-designed theme, but it does take some liberties with how it translates Google+ to WordPress (so it doesn’t look quite as accurate to Google’s own design).

Reflex+

reflex plus image

Reflex+ shares all of the features mentioned in the above two theme but it also brings in jQuery and incorporates AJAX for some tasks, such as the “read more” post navigation, helping it appear more fluid and seamless.


Want More?


Google+ is still a relatively new service locked behind an invite-only registration system. No doubt as time progresses and the service grows, there will be more options for publishers. Right now there are a couple of options if you’re a developer interested in having a go at creating your own Google+ plug-in.

If you’d like to gain access to the official Google+ API, you’ll need to sign up with Google to register interest in a Google+ developer account. Unfortunately, the API is not yet public. It’s unclear whether this will change as the service matures, but inquiring about developer access is certainly worth looking into if you want serious Google+ integration and sharing between your site and the service.

For a more portable (and presumably trimmed-down) solution, software developer Jason Striegel has put together a collection of PHP utilities for a locally-hosted Google+ API service. In its current state, the API will allow you to retrieve post and profile data and post to Google+. You can check out his code on GitHub. This is a great option to include within your own distributed code, such as WordPress plug-ins and widgets.


More About: dev, Google, Google Plus, WordPress

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Already using Google+? Follow Mashable’s Pete Cashmore for the latest about the platform’s new features, tips and tricks as well as social media and technology updates.

If the 10 million users that still-invite-only Google+ accumulated in just two weeks weren’t enough to make Facebook nervous, the latest report about the new social network’s gaming platform might. Google will take a smaller percentage of revenue away from game developers than Facebook does, reports All Things D.

Google reportedly will also, unlike Facebook, host games on its own servers — which could make them faster and less buggy.

The Google+ code includes mentions of a gaming platform, and Google has reportedly invested as much as $200 million in the dominant social gaming company Zynga. But there’s been no official word about if and when the game platform for Google will launch or what it will look like.

Google did, however, make
http://googlecommerce.blogspot.com/2011/07/make-money-with-in-app-payments-for-web.html” target=”_blank”>in-app payments
available to web developers this week. This is a technology that would be required for in-game payments, All Things D points out, and Google is only charging a 5% fee for the service.

If Google sticks in this ballpark with its fees for game developers, it will be severely undercutting the industry standard of 30% set by Facebook and Apple.

More About: facebook, games, Google, Google Plus

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