If you haven’t noticed, Wednesday’s Google Doodle pays tribute to Akira Yoshizawa, the grandmaster of origami. And to highlight the art form, the designer is encouraging the public to re-create the image by folding paper to create a real-life version of the doodle.

The designer of the origami Google Doodle is Robert J. Lang, considered one of the world’s top origami masters. He walks you through how to create the origami doodle in a post on Google’s Official Blog.

To create a origami doodle at home, simply download Lang’s PDF with the crease patterns for each of the letters and fold along the lines. The red lines indicate a “valley fold” — or downward fold — while the blue lines indicate a high “mountain” fold.

Google Doodle Origami

“To design these (or any letterform in this style), one can take a narrow strip of paper, fold it back and forth to trace the outline of the desired letter, unfold it, mark the creases, then arrange multiple copies of the strip pattern on a larger rectangle,” Lang noted on the site.

“The resulting crease pattern is moderately complex, and it gives a lovely 3-D form when folded, but conceptually, it is quite straightforward.”

Lang also discussed how he approached the design for the Google Doodle.

SEE ALSO: Google Doodle Celebrates Origami Master Akira Yoshizawa
“When I was first approached by Google to help create a doodle commemorating Yoshizawa’s work, I jumped at the chance,” Lang wrote. “Google set the parameters of the design: the Google logo, of course, but to be folded with origami and then decorated with examples of Yoshizawa’s designs.”

He created two logo styles for the company to select from — one was a classic style and the other had a 3-D look with pleats. Google went with the latter.

Google Origami

“The butterflies in the doodle are folded from one of Yoshizawa’s earliest, yet most iconic designs. It is deceptive in its simplicity, but can express great subtlety in its shaping and attitude,” Lang said. “The combination of simplicity and depth is part of the essence of origami, and is key to Yoshizawa’s work and legacy.”


Top 10 Animated Google Doodles


 

The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Google, google doodle

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Google is celebrating International Women’s Day today by giving all the ladies out there a flower – the virtual kind, of course, placed in the middle of the latest Google Doodle.

Originally a socialist holiday, the International Women’s Day originated in the U.S., where it was first celebrated on Feb 28., 1909, by the Socialist Party of America.

The date was switched around quite a bit in the following years, and the significance of the event varied a lot in different countries. In Russia, it was celebrated on the last Sunday in February (which fell on March 8 on the Gregorian calendar) since the February Revolution of 1917. In 1949, March 8 was established as an official date for the holiday (for women only) in China, and the date stuck.

Finally, in 1977 the United Nations invited member states to proclaim March 8 the UN Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace, after which the date gained major international significance.

Today, March 8 is a national holiday in many countries around the world, including Russia and China; in many others, it is customary for men to give women flowers on this day. A tip for all you guys reading this: Regardless of where you live, you can’t really go wrong by giving that significant lady in your life some flowers.

 

The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Google, google doodle, March 8, women’s day

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Cupid’s big day is upon us again, and Google is celebrating the Feb. 14 holiday with an animated Doodle that demonstrates the limitations of the company’s search engine when romance is thrown into the mix.

The 71-second Valentine’s Day animation on Google‘s homepage tells the story of a boy’s attempt to swoon his crush. He initially turns to Google Search for tips, but everything it suggests doesn’t work. We won’t spoil the rest, so watch the clip above to find out what happens next.

Near the end, the animation pieces together a collage showing all types of love, including what appears to be a same-sex couple, which many Twitter users have already noted in their tweets.

Tony Bennett’s “Cold, Cold Heart” accompanies the animation.

SEE ALSO: 10 Clever Marriage Proposals Using Social Media, Tech, Games and Memes

Google’s first Valentine’s Day Doodle went live in 2000. Check out all of them since then in the gallery below, or learn more about how Google Doodles are created here.

What do you think of Google’s latest Valentine’s Day Doodle? Sound off in the comments.

On a fun sidenote: If you type a certain algebraic equation into Google search, you’ll get a special surprise.

2011




Pop artist Robert Indiana is the inspiration behind this year’s Doodle, with the search engine’s logo emulating Indiana’s iconic “love” sculpture.

Click here to view this gallery.

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Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the 200th birthday of writer Charles Dickens.

Born on Feb. 7 1812 in Landport, England, Charles John Huffam Dickens grew up in tough, working-class conditions. At age 12, after his father was thrown into a debtors’ prison, he was forced to work at a blacking factory.

This experience later influenced many of his famous novels, including Oliver Twist, David Copperfield and Great Expectations.

Starting his career as a journalist, Dickens eventually started writing literary prose, which was published in monthly installments before being released as books.

His realistic portray of England’s lower-class life made him one of the greatest Victorian novelists and one of the most recognizable names in literature.

Dickens was also a philanthropist; together with Angela Burdett Coutts he founded the Urania Cottage, a home for “fallen” women, helping them learn to read and write.

Dickens died from the consequences of a stroke in his home on June 8, 1870. His last words were, reportedly, “Be natural my children. For the writer that is natural has fulfilled all the rules of art.”

Bonus Gallery: Top 10 animated Google Doodles:

The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Charles Dickens, Google, google doodle

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Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the 374th birthday of Nicolas Steno, often called the “father of geology.”

Born on January 11, 1638, Steno was a Danish bishop and scientist best known for his “principle of original horizontality,” stating that layers of sediment are originally deposited horizontally due to gravity, as well as “law of superposition,” which states that layers of sediment are deposited in such a way that the oldest reside on the bottom and the youngest on top.

With his research, Steno laid down the foundations of stratigraphy, a branch of geology that studies rock layers. He also had notable contributions to paleontology, as he was one of the first to suggest that fossils were remains of once-living organisms.

Steno died in 1686. He converted to Catholicism from Lutheranism, and Pope John Paul II beatified him in 1988.

Bonus: Here are the best Google Doodles of 2011:

1. Martin Luther King Jr.

This Google Doodle, displayed Jan. 17, features a group of children playing hopscotch — an homage to Martin Luther King Jr. Day.

Click here to view this gallery.

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Today’s Google Doodle honors the birthday of Robert Noyce, the co-founder of Intel and the co-inventor of the integrated circuit or microchip, used in practically all electronic equipment today.

Born on Dec. 12, 1927, in Burlington, Iowa, Noyce moved to Grinnell and finished high school and college there, graduating with a BA in physics and mathematics, and later receiving a doctorate in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

After working as a research engineer at Philco and Shockley corporations, he co-founded the Fairchild Semiconductor in 1957, a company that pioneered transistor and integrated circuit manufacturing.

In 1958, Jack Kilby invented the integrated circuit using germanium, later receiving a Nobel Prize for his work. Noyce’s breakthrough, which replaced germanium with silicon, came half year later, but solved some practical problems in Kilby’s design and laid the foundation for all modern computer chips.

After leaving Fairchild, together with Gordon Moore and Arthur Rock he co-founded an even more influential corporation in 1968: Intel, where he was known for his laid-back, modest style of management. Intel was the first company to start successfully manufacturing microprocessors, which helped it become the IT giant it is today.

Noyce died June 3, 1990 after suffering a heart attack. Today’s Doodle depicts the ever-changing Google logo as a microchip, marking Noyce’s 84th birthday and reminding us that — perhaps — we wouldn’t be Googling anything if it weren’t for Noyce’s visionary spirit and inventions.

The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Google, google doodle, intel, microchip, Robert Noyce

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Today’s Google Doodle honors Mexican painter and communist icon Diego Rivera.

Rivera was born in Guanajuato on Dec 8, 1886. He studied art in Mexico City and later continued his studies in Europe.

After his return to Mexico in 1921, he became involved in a government-sponsored program that had artists cover the walls of official institutions with murals.

Rivera’s often politically themed murals helped established Mexican muralism, an art movement that took place from the 1920s to the 1960s, heavily influencing later generations of Mexican artists.

Rivera is also known for being the husband of another famous painter, Frida Kahlo.

He died on Nov. 24, 1957; his murals can be seen in Mexico City, San Francisco, Detroit, and New York City.


BONUS: More Google Doodles


The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Google, google doodle

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Google is highlighting the 2011 Egyptian elections with a doodle on its search homepage for Egypt. Each of the six letters that spell out “Google” perform an action of the voting process — from waiting in line to adding a vote to the ballot box.

Monday marks the country’s first parliamentary elections since President Hosni Mubarak was ousted in the wake of a massive uprising earlier this year. Polls are open in Cairo, Alexandria and seven other provinces. Giza, Aswan and Suez voting begins on Dec. 14, Bloomberg reports.

Though it’s uncertain whether the Google doodle will inspire Egyptians to vote, they’re undoubtedly taking notice.

“I find [the Goodle doodle] very significant to the new generation in Egypt that uses technology. We all know what Google is and what it means for them to give us some international attention,” says Nasry Esmat, an Egyptian journalist living in New York. “The doodle adds more to our pride.”

The doodle isn’t Google’s first contribution to the much-anticipated Egypt elections. In September, the company developed an election API to facilitate the voting process. It not only gave citizens easy access to elections information, including polling locations and candidate profiles, but also allowed mobile service providers the opportunity to develop election applications.

“The majority of Egyptians still cant use the Internet or computers, but these tools are very effective because they help those who have basic knowledge to spread the information,” Esmat says. “And, honestly, those who have basic knowledge are the ones who can make change in Egypt.”


BONUS: More Google Doodles


The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: google doodle, trending

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Today’s Doodle on Google‘s homepage is a tribute to Louis Daguerre, the French physicist who invented daguerreotype, the first commercially successful form of photography.

Louis Daguerre was born on Nov. 18, 1787 in Cormeilles-en-Parisis, France. Today’s Doodle celebrates his 224th birthday.

He began his career as a designer and painter, but his breakthrough came in 1839, when he announced his invention of the daguerreotype, a photographic process which produced a single positive image, which could not easily be replicated. It experienced a few decades of commercial success and influenced later photographic processes.

Daguerreotypes were usually portraits, and Google’s Doodle is reminiscent of a classic family portrait from the era.

Check out some of our favorite Google Doodles in the gallery below.

The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: Doodle, Google, google doodle, Louis Daguerre, photography, trending

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Google is remembering troops this Veterans Day by flying a yellow ribbon on its homepage.

Its latest Google Doodle, a watercolor-style pastoral scene, swaps the “l” in the Google logo for a tree with a yellow ribbon tied to it. Displaying yellow ribbons is a tradition that predates the civil war in songs and folklore as a symbol of loyalty to loved ones welcomed home.

“In recent years,” says the website of Yellow Ribbon America, “it has been displayed to show our support for our service men and women to keep them first and foremost in our hearts and prayers.”

SEE ALSO: Top 10 Animated Google Doodles [VIDEOS] | Where Do Google Doodles Come From?

Veterans day, originally named Armistice Day, is celebrated in the U.S. every Nov. 11, the day fighting between the Allied nations and Germany officially ended in 1918. Google last honored the holiday with a Doodle in 2009.

The annual National Veterans Day Ceremony will take place on Friday at 11 a.m. ET in Arlington National Cemetery. Regional sites for Veterans Day activities can be found at the Department of Veterans Affairs website.


BONUS: More Google Doodles


The Christmas Google Doodle

Each package gets larger with a mouse-over, and a click on it returns search results pertinent to a specific country or the particular items featured in a scene. This one is from December 24, 2010.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: google doodle, Veterans Day

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