The third generation iPad is officially here, and fans all over the world braved the early morning today to wait in line and get their hands on the new tablet.

Line lengths varies around the world. More than 400 shoppers waited outside an Apple store in China, while more than 200 would-be owners stood in line outside an Apple store in Boston. Still others claimed to only have waited just 10 minutes, or not at all, for the clock to strike 8 am local time and the doors to open.

Even Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak waited in line to grab the new iPad. He didn’t have to, of course — the company habitually offers him any new device he wants. But as he explained to What’s Trending, he’s fond of the “real-world” experience that comes with owning a new device.

“More than anything else, it’s just sort of like it’s become a ritual, almost. Because I’ve done it so many times, I’m doing it again…I’d rather be in there and be genuine like the real people,” he said.

Clearly, both sleep and money were sacrificed in droves. But here’s the question: Is the third-generation iPad really worth the lines and the buzz?

Mashable‘s Christina Warren joined the crowds to survey the HD tablet herself. A “drool-worthy” display and an amazingly fast 4G LTE network are just some of the first impressions she noted for the new device.

The iPad’s sharp camera was another prominent feature. Comparing it side-by-side with the iPad 2, its superiority was undeniable.

So, what do you think of the new iPad? Was it worth the wait and the hype? Let us know in the comments.


BONUS: The View From the iPad Line [PICS]


The View From the iPad Line




Mashable reader Rafael Savino shows off the view from 2nd in line in Houston.

Click here to view this gallery.

More About: apple, galleries, ipad, Video

For more Dev & Design coverage:


On this day in 1974, Clyde Dawson made history as the first consumer to buy a product that had been scanned into a till by its Universal Product Code. The product was a $0.67 10-pack of Wrigley’s Juicy Fruit gum purchased at a supermarket in Troy, Ohio. The UPC went on to become more commonly known as a “bar code.”

Now ubiquitous in the U.S., UK, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere, the bar code has not changed visibly in the past three decades — a boring monotone patch around which packaging designers must maneuver. Many don’t realize, however, that as long as a bar code is still scannable, you can have tons of fun with creative designs. Although popular in Japan, custom bar codes for product packaging haven’t gone significantly mainstream in the west, except for a few notable examples, such as Amazon’s Kindle packaging.

We’d like to see more bar code creativity, so to celebrate the UPC’s birthday, we’re taking a look at 10 brilliant designs from experts in the designer bar code field — Japanese company Design Barcode and New Jersey-based branding and packaging design agency Miller Creative‘s Vanity Barcodes.

1. Beer Pouring

In this design, we especially love the numbers pouring out of the bottle.

2. Piano

Noodles

This would make a great graphic for photography product packaging.

5. Sneakers

This gorgeous design imagines the bars as rain.

7. Surfer

The iconic tape cassette becomes a music-themed bar code.

9. Cup

Umbrella

Mac, iPhone and iPad

The second Sunday in May is when the United States, Canada and a great many other countries around the world honor their mothers, celebrate motherhood and thank moms for all they do.

Since 2000 Google has marked the occasion every year with one of its infamous Google “Doodles,” transforming the classic homepage to a tribute to moms everywhere.

We’ve looked back this Mothering Sunday over a decade of mom-themed Doodles. Take a look through our gallery below and let us know which Doodle you’d like to dedicate to your mom in the comments below or via one of the share options to the top left.

2011

For this year, Google goes with a lovely yet simple design.

2010 — United States

Last year saw a great Google homepage for the United States made up of quirky glass vases…

2010 — Global

…While the rest of the world enjoyed a tulip-themed effort.

2009

The logo was pretty in pink in 2009 with a lovely bunch of blooms making up the “l.”

2008

This sweet scene sees a mother duck and two chicks decorating the famous logo.

2007

Children’s hand-drawn pictures are a cute touch on 2007’s Mother’s Day Doodle.

2006

Google said it with roses and entwined “os” back in ’06.

2005

The search giant keeps the floral theme going in 2005.

2004

A single pink rose adorns 2004’s offering.

2003

Another Mother’s Day, another vase of posies, again neatly taking the place of the “l.”

2002

A single red rose was Google’s offering to moms everywhere in 2002.

2001 & 2000

The original Mother’s Day Google Doodle appeared in the year 2000 and remained unchanged the next year. It linked to a tribute page to the then Googler’s moms.

A Tribute to Our Moms

And here is a grab of part of that page, still live today at Google.com/moms. With the sweet statement that “no search could find better moms than these,” Google illustrated the lyrics of Howard Johnson’s song M-O-T-H-E-R with portraits. Aw!

More About: design, galleries, gallery, Google, google doodles, List, Lists, logo design, logos, mothering sunday, mothers day, trending

For more Dev & Design coverage:

Has this chair somehow defied the laws of gravity? In the picture above, you’ll notice there is someone standing on it, supported by a single leg. How is this even possible?

Artist Peter Bristol created “Cut Chair.” He’s the lead designer at the Seattle-based product development consultancy Carbon Design Group, well-known for its design of products for Microsoft and many others.

So far, “Cut Chair” is in the prototype stage, but Bristol is looking for a partner to build it for multiple installations or mass production.

How does it work? See if you can guess before you dive into the gallery below, where the secret will be revealed.

Cut Chair Front View

It looks impossible.

Cut Chair Side View

How does it work? Magnets?

Cut Chair: The Solution

It’s bolted to a steel plate hidden under the carpet. Did you figure it out? Let us know in the comments.

More About: galleries, Magic Chair, Microsoft designer, Peter Bristol

For more Dev & Design coverage:




It might look like a far-fetched timepiece from a sci-fi flick, but this design concept by Jonathan Frey uses E-Ink technology that’s becoming commonplace today. Not only is E-Ink breaking sales records inside Amazon Kindles and other e-readers — it’s making its debut in watches as well.

This two-display beauty uses E-Ink on both screens. The bottom screen shows its striped numerals over a sinister black background, while the top display’s day and date peek through a grid of shiny black metal. Everything is controlled with buttons on the side.

I’ve worn and reviewed an E-Ink watch, and it proved itself to be more energy efficient than conventional watches with LCD displays. An E-Ink watch drains its battery the most when it’s changing its numerals; the rest of the time it simply keeps time while it displays the results of the electronically charged rearrangement of its particles.

Another advantage: Designers love it. E-Ink displays can be configured in radically different ways from their LCD forebears, including curved surfaces that really do look like something you might see on the wrist of Captain Picard on the deck of the USS Enterprise. And later this year, color E-Ink displays will become available.

There’s no telling when this watch might see the light of day, but given the rapid expansion of E-Ink technology, watches like this can’t be too far off.

E-Ink Watch of the Future

E-Ink Watch of the Future

E-Ink Watch of the Future

Images courtesy of Yanko Design

More About: Design Concepts, Display tech, e-ink, galleries, Timepieces, watches