As you know Google has started an initiative to enhance connection security; Google is encouraging – some might say forcing- website owners to secure their blog or website by installing SSL certificate.  In October 2017 Google Chrome started showing “Not Secure” warning when visitors enter data on an HTTP page or if visiting HTTP page in private mode. In July 2018 Google launched the next phase, by shows “Not Secure” warning when visiting all HTTP sites through chrome. In this post, we will cover the basics and your options.

 

What is an SSL? Why move to HTTPS? What are the benefits?

In a nutshell, SSL certificate enables secure communication over the internet by encrypting the data such as your password or credit card information which is being transmitted between your computers and the server. When visiting a website or blog that is secured by SSL certificate you will see a padlock icon or green bar on the left side of your URL bar.

Moving from HTTP to HTTPS helps you with organic search ranking, in 2014 Google published a blog – HTTPS as a ranking signal – they announced that “we’re starting to use HTTPS as a ranking signal.” If you are looking for an uptick in your organic search traffic your better make the switch NOW. The other benefit is you are not only building confidence by safeguarding the communication of sensitive information but also protecting your website against hackers injecting malicious ads or spyware.  Since most of applications and tools are now communicating over HTTPS you will find it difficult to keep your website functional.

 

What SSL certificate should you get?

In this post, I am not going to talk about certificate validation level nor certificate types but I am going to talk about what is your mind, how much does it cost to get an SSL certificate? Well, you have two options; you can either to go with Open Certificate Authority and Commercial Certificate Authority.

> Open Certificate Authority: it is a community-driven CA that issues free SSL certificates, Lets Encrypt and CAcert are two leading Open Certificate Authority. These types of SSL certificates do not provide any warranty, support is limited and you only need to prove the domain ownership in order to generate the certificate.

> Commercial Certificate Authority: this type of SSL certificate is widely used by online stores and/or businesses. The approval process is done through Email, in some cases, the SSL Certificate Authority might ask for business registration and other government-issued documents to complete the verification process. The commercial certificate provides after-sale support, warranty up to $2,000,000 (depending on the type of certificate you order) and is compatible with 99% of browsers and systems.

 

As we have mentioned in our previous blogs, we are offering Let’s Encrypt to our customers, almost all of our website and WordPress hosting clients are now able to activate Lets Encrypt through their control panel. We also offer Commercial Certificate to our customers. For detail information about the Type of SSL certificate, we offer please click here.